Geological Map of the Rhobell Fawr District (Wells, 1925)

Title: Geological Map of the Rhobell Fawr District

Creator: Alfred Kingsley Wells

Description: Published in ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’ vol. 81 (1925) pl. 32 at a scale of 1:31,180 or 2 inches to the mile.

Publisher: The Geological Society of London

Date: 1925

Format: Map. Colour. Printed on paper, bound with text.

Image reference: 07-54

Size of original: 37 cm x 26 cm

Recommended print size: 16″ x 12″ (for full-size print)

Sky and the adjoining islands (Stewart after MacCulloch, 1817)

Title: ‘Sky and the adjoining islands’

Creator: J Stewart after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Hand coloured map, ‘Sky and the adjoining islands’.

Source: Published in: MacCulloch, John, “Corrections and Additions to the Sketch of the Mineralogy of Sky, published in the third volume of the Transactions of the Geological Society”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society’, series 1, vol 4 (1817), pl 9. Also included in MacCulloch, John, ‘A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland including the Isle of Man’, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1819.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 07-53

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Sky and the adjoining islands (Stewart after MacCulloch, 1817)

Title: ‘Sky and the adjoining islands’

Creator: J Stewart after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Uncoloured map print, ‘Sky and the adjoining islands’. Originally published in the ‘Transactions of the Geological Society’, series 1, vol 4 (1817), pl 9. A hand coloured version was included in MacCulloch, John, ‘A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland including the Isle of Man’, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1819.

Date: 1817

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/4/16

Image reference: 07-52

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Trap veins at Airdnamurchan point… (Stewart after MacCulloch, 1819)

Title: ‘Trap veins at Airdnamurchan point…’

Creator: J Stewart after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘Trap veins at Airdnamurchan point: sections illustrating the islands of the Clyde’. Published in MacCulloch, John, ‘A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland including the Isle of Man’, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1819. Plate 33.

Date: 31 May 1819

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/4/15

Image reference: 07-51

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Granite veins and gneiss at Cape Wrath… (Stewart after MacCulloch, 1819)

Title: ‘Granite veins and gneiss at Cape Wrath…’

Creator: J Stewart after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘Granite veins and gneiss at Cape Wrath; alternations of gneiss and red sandstone; sandstone mountains on the coast of Ross-shire’. Published in MacCulloch, John, ‘A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland including the Isle of Man’, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1819. Plate 31.

Date: 31 May 1819

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/4/14

Image reference: 07-50

 

Selected parts of the East Coast of Trotternish (Stewart after MacCulloch, 1819)

Title: ‘Selected parts of the East Coast of Trotternish’

Creator: J Stewart after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘Selected parts of the East Coast of Trotternish’, showing the interference of the trap with the secondary strata. Published in MacCulloch, John, ‘A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland including the Isle of Man’, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1819. Plate 17.

Date: 31 May 1819

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/4/12

Image reference: 07-49

 

Various flexures of gneiss in Lewis (Stewart after MacCulloch, 1819)

Title: ‘Various flexures of gneiss in Lewis’

Creator: J Stewart after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘Various flexures of gneiss in Lewis’. Published in MacCulloch, John, ‘A Description of the Western Islands of Scotland including the Isle of Man’, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1819. Plate 12.

Date: 31 May 1819

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/4/11

Image reference: 07-48

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Curvilinear Sections from Glen Roy to the Sea (MacCulloch, 1817)

Title: ‘Curvilinear Sections from Glen Roy to the Sea’

Creator: MacCulloch, John

Description: ‘Curvilinear Sections from Glen Roy to the Sea’.

Source: MacCulloch, John, “On the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 4 (1817), pp314-392. Plate 22.

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 07-47

 

Sections of Glen Roy (MacCulloch, 1817)

Title: Sections of Glen Roy

Creator: John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Sections of Glen Roy.

Source: MacCulloch, John, “On the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 4 (1817), pp314-392. Plate 21.

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 07-46

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Map of Glen Roy (MacCulloch, 1817)

Title: Map of Glen Roy

Creator: John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Map of Glen Roy, further showing the communications with the sea and the other valleys in the vicinity that bear the marks of the lines.

Source: MacCulloch, John, “On the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 4 (1817), pp314-392. Plate 20.

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 07-45

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

Map shewing the Connections of Glen Roy with the Sea (Cross, 1817)

Title: ‘Map shewing the Connections of Glen Roy with the Sea’

Creator: Cross, Russell Court, Covent Garden

Description: ‘Map shewing the Connections of Glen Roy with the Sea’

Source: MacCulloch, John, “On the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 4 (1817), pp314-392. Plate 19.

Format: Coloured engraving

Image reference: 07-44

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Plan of Glen Roy and of the Parallel Roads (MacCulloch, 1817)

Title: Plan of Glen Roy and of the Parallel Roads

Creator: John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Plan and profile of Glen Roy and of the Parallel Roads.

Source: MacCulloch, John, “On the Parallel Roads of Glen Roy”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 4 (1817), pp314-392. Plate 18.

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 07-43

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Sketch map of the Rhenosterberg, South Africa (Stow, 1858)

Title: Rough sketch of the vicinity of a portion of the Rhenosterberg.

Creator: George William Stow (1822-1882)

Description: Rough sketch of the vicinity of a portion of the Rhenosterberg.

Accompanied paper read before the Society, 3 November 1858, and published as: Stow, G W. “On some Fossils from South Africa”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 15 (1859), pp193-195. Illustrations not published.

Date: 1858

Format: Ink on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/205

Image reference: 07-42

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

Geologische Elementarkarte, plate 3 (Klöpfel, 1838)

Title: Uebergangs-und secundaere gebilde (Transition to Secondary structures)

Creator: H Klöpfel for Im Verlage des Landes – Industrie – Comptoirs, Weimar

Description: One of three sheets (probably from an original set of six) which were clearly devised to be seen together as at the top of each is a continuous ideal section of the Earth’s crust intended to show the order of deposition of stratified rocks and their relations to unstratified rocks. Underneath are detailed lithographs of fossils, views and other geological images arranged according to the time period from which they originated.

Not much is known about the three plates, other than that they were in the possession of George Bellas Greenough, and formed part of the bequest given to the Society in 1856. The plates still bear Greenough’s original labels on which he states that the contents had been taken without acknowledgement from William Buckland’s ‘Bridgewater Treatise’ [Geology and mineralogy considered with reference to natural theology, published in 1836]. Whilst the striking top section is obviously based on the one included in the ‘Bridgewater Treatise’, in fact the publishers, Im Verlage des Landes-Industrie-Comptoirs, reference a number of contemporary works from other leading scientists of the day including Louis Agassiz (1807-1873), Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Georges Cuvier (1769-1832). Hence the plates describe what was known of the subject at the time of publication – a lesson in elementary geology if you like.

This plate shows Transition to Secondary structures, equivalent to the modern geological time terminology of Late Palaeozoic to Mesozoic eras.
These eras saw dramatic changes in the Earth’s natural history, notably the development of more sophisticated life forms such as fish, amphibians and reptiles, and the appearance flowering plants and conifers.

For a more detailed look at the plate, see the following exhibition: www.geolsoc.org.uk/Library-and-Information-Services/Exhib…

Date: 1838

Format: Hand coloured lithograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/986

Image reference: 07-41

Size of original: 83 cm x 57 cm.

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm

Imaginary plan and sections of Wernerian formations (Theonert, c.1810)

Title: Imaginary plan and sections displaying the Wernerian formations

Creator: Thoenert

Description: Print, of an imaginary plan and sections displaying the Wernerian formations, taken from unknown source. The sheet has been annotated in German with a translation in English by George Bellas Greenough.

Date: [c.1810]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/465

Image reference: 07-40

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Theoretical section through the Paris Basin (Cuvier, Brongniart and Clerget, 1832)

Title: Theoretical geological section through the Paris Basin

Creator: Engraved by Clerget for Georges Cuvier and Alexandre Brongniart

Description: Print, ‘Coupe théorique des divers terrains roches et minéraux qui entrent dans le composition du sol du Bassin de Paris’ by Clerget, under direction of Alexandre Brongniart. Theoretical section of the rocks and minerals of the Paris Basin.

Date: 1832

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/503

Image reference: 07-39

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Yorkshire (William Smith, 1821)

Title: Geological Map of Yorkshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Yorkshire, today divided into North, South and West Yorkshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire. This map was originally published in four seperate sheets in the fourth of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties. Copies of the four sheets have been digitally stitched together to produce the image above.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1821
Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.  Digital stitched from four original images.

Image reference: 07-38

Size of original:  85 cm. x 97 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 90 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSYorks

Geological Map of Wiltshire (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Wiltshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Wiltshire. This map was published in the first of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-37

Size of original:  65 cm x 56 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSWilts

Geological Map of Sussex (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Sussex

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Sussex, today divided into East Sussex and West Sussex. This map was published in the first of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-36

Size of original:  56 cm x 64 cm

Recommended print size:

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSSussex

Geological Map of Surry (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Surry

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Surrey. This map was published in the second of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-35

Size of original:  57 cm x 65 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSSurrey

Geological Map of Rutlandshire (William Smith, 1822)

Title: Geological Map of Rutlandshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Rutlandshire, now called Rutland. This map was published in the fifth of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1822

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-34

Size of original:  66 cm x 57 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSRutld

Geological map of Oxfordshire (William Smith, 1820)

Title: Geological Map of Oxfordshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Oxfordshire. This map was published in the third of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1820

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-33

Size of original:  66 cm x 58 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSOxon

Geological Map of Norfolk (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Norfolk

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Norfolk. This map was published in the first of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-32

Size of original:  67 cm x 57 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSNorf

Geological Map of Leicestershire (William Smith, 1822)

Title: Geological Map of Leicestershire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Leicestershire. This map was published in the fifth of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1822

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-31

Size of original:  65 cm x 57 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSLeics

‘A view of the strata which present themselves on the shore of Folkestone’

Title: ‘A view of the strata which present themselves on the shore of Folkestone’

Creator: Robert Ferguson (fl 1809-1840)

Description: Painting, ‘A view of the strata which present themselves on the shore of Folkestone’, which was sent to the Society, along with a geological description dated 1 November 1811.

A – Represents the chalk hills which are not sufficiently thrown back
B – The chalk cliffs in the direction of Dover
1 – The highest stratum is about 30 or 40 feet in breadth, and appears to be a Blackish clay stratum mixed with a little sand containing shells…
2 – A thick sand stone stratum containing thin strata in it more indurated than the rest containing some shells…
3 – A Black clay stratum about four feet thick, containing some shells and a little sand.
4 – A stratum of about a foot and a half thick, of coarse grained sand stone of a greenish colour containing small rounded fragments of a green argillaceous stone.
5 – A stratum similar to no.3.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society which were collected together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 1811

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/44

Image reference: 05-91

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Kent (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Kent

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Kent. This map was published in the first of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-30

Size of original:  66 cm x 57 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSKent

‘Curvature in Lias near Shepton Mallet’

Title: ‘Curvature in Lias near Shepton Mallet’

Creator: Unknown

Description: Painting, ‘Curvature in Lias near Shepton Mallet’, given to the Society by the Reverends William Daniel Conybeare and William Buckland, 18 June 1813.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society which were collected together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1813]

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/30

Image reference: 05-90

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

Geological Map of Gloucestershire (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Gloucestershire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Gloucestershire. This map was published in the second of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819
Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-29

Size of original:  66 cm x 57 cm

Recommended print size:

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSGlos

‘Dovedale’

Title: Drawing, ‘Dovedale’

Creator: Unknown

Description: Drawing, ‘Dovedale’, showing the Dovedale Valley in the Peak District, England, depicting the area’s famous limestone rock pillars.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society which were collected together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [1800s]

Format: Ink & wash

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/29

Image reference: 05-89

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Durham (William Smith, 1824)

Title: Geological Map of Durham

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Durham. This map was published in the sixth of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

A later 1831 edition can be found here: www.flickr.com/photos/geologicalsocietylibrary/1536435877…

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1824

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-28

Size of original:  60 cm x 66 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSDurh

Vixen Tor, Dartmoor

Title: Drawing of ‘Vixen Tor, Dartmoor’

Creator: John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Original artwork for: John MacCulloch’s paper “On the Granite Tors of Cornwall”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 2 (1814), pp66-78, plate 5.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints of geological subjects presented to the Society, and collated together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 1807

Format: Pencil drawing

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/35

Image reference: 05-88

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Buckinghamshire (William Smith, 1820)

Title: Geological Map of Buckinghamshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Buckinghamshire. This map was published in the third of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1820

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-27

Size of original:  66 cm. x 57 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSBucks

Cheese Wring near Liskeard, Cornwall

Title: Drawing of the ‘Cheese Wring near Liskeard, Cornwall’

Creator: John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Original artwork for: John MacCulloch’s paper “On the Granite Tors of Cornwall”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 2 (1814), pp66-78, plate 4.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints of geological subjects presented to the Society, and collated together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 1807

Format: Pencil drawing

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/34

Image reference: 05-87

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Berkshire (William Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological Map of Berkshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Berkshire. This map was published in the second of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-26

Size of original:  56 cm x 65 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSBerks

The logging rock at the Lands End Cornwall

Title: Drawing of ‘The logging rock at the Lands End Cornwall’

Creator: John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Original artwork for: John MacCulloch’s paper “On the Granite Tors of Cornwall”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Vol 2 (1814), pp66-78, plate 4.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints of geological subjects presented to the Society, and collated together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 1796

Format: Pencil drawing

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/33

Image reference: 05-86

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Bedfordshire (William Smith, 1820)

Title: Geological Map of Bedfordshire

Creator: William Smith

Description: Geological map of the English county of Bedfordshire. This map was published in the third of William Smith’s series of six atlases of geological maps of English counties.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1820

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-25

Size of original:  66 cm x 55 cm

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

Also available from the Geological Society online shop at:  http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/WSBeds

‘Basaltic tower called Castro Levit at the foot of Magilligan Facade’

Title: ‘Basaltic tower called Castro Levit at the foot of Magilligan Facade’

Creator: William Richardson (1740-1820)

Description: One of a series of illustrations relating to: Richardson, William, “A Letter on the Alterations that have taken place in the Structure of Rocks, on the surface of the basaltic Country in the counties of Derry and Antrim”, read 17 March 1808, and published in ‘Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London’, vol 98 (1808), pp187-222. The drawings were presented to the Society by George Bellas Greenough and William Babington, 3 March 1809.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society, and collated together in a volume marked ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1808]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/10

Image reference: 05-85

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

A general map of Ireland… (Griffith, 1855)

Title: A general map of Ireland to accompany the report of the Railway Commissioners shewing the principal physical features and geological structure of the country

Creator: Sir Richard John Griffith

Description: Revised third edition.  Original printed in six separate sheets, this map has been scanned and then digitally stitched together to make one large map.

Publisher: Hodges & Smith, Dublin

Date: 1855

Format: Geological map, ink (lithograph from engraved plate) and water-colour, on paper, bound in atlas.

Image reference: 07-24

Size of original:  185 cm x 152 cm.

Recommended print size: 100 x 90 cm

‘Whyn dyke at Rovin Valley’

Title: ‘Whyn dyke at Rovin Valley’

Creator: William Richardson (1740-1820)

Description: One of a series of illustrations relating to: Richardson, William, “A Letter on the Alterations that have taken place in the Structure of Rocks, on the surface of the basaltic Country in the counties of Derry and Antrim”, read 17 March 1808, and published in ‘Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London’, vol 98 (1808), pp187-222. The drawings were presented to the Society by George Bellas Greenough and William Babington, 3 March 1809.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society, and collated together in a volume marked ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1808]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/9

Image reference: 05-84

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of Arran (The Survey, 1910)

Title: Geological Map of Arran

Creator:  Geological Survey of Scotland

Description: Geological map of the Scottish island of Arran, at a scale of 1 inch to the mile.

Date: 1910

Format: Geological map, original on paper, then dissected and mounted on linen.

Image reference: 07-12

Size of original:  67 cm x 54 cm.

Recommended print size: 70 x 50 cm

‘Isolated rock and whyn dyke at Port Cooan’

Title: ‘Isolated rock and whyn dyke at Port Cooan’

Creator: William Richardson (1740-1820)

Description: One of a series of illustrations relating to: Richardson, William, “A Letter on the Alterations that have taken place in the Structure of Rocks, on the surface of the basaltic Country in the counties of Derry and Antrim”, read 17 March 1808, and published in ‘Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London’, vol 98 (1808), pp187-222. The drawings were presented to the Society by George Bellas Greenough and William Babington, 3 March 1809.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society, and collated together in a volume marked ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1808]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/8

Image reference: 05-83

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Carte géologique du Massif du Mont-Blanc (Duparc and Mrazec, 1896)

Title: Carte géologique du Massif du Mont-Blanc (‘Geological map of Mont Blanc massif’)

Creator: L Duparc and L Mrazec

Description: Geological map of Mont Blanc massif, a mountain range in the Alps named after Mont Blanc.

Date: 1896

Format: Geological map.  Original on paper, dissected then mounted on linen.

Image reference: 07-22

Size of original:  66 cm x 40 cm

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm

‘Oblique undulating dyke near Seaport one mile west from the Giants Causeway’

Title: ‘Oblique undulating dyke near Seaport one mile west from the Giants Causeway’

Creator: William Richardson (1740-1820)

Description: One of a series of illustrations relating to: Richardson, William, “A Letter on the Alterations that have taken place in the Structure of Rocks, on the surface of the basaltic Country in the counties of Derry and Antrim”, read 17 March 1808, and published in ‘Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London’, vol 98 (1808), pp187-222. The drawings were presented to the Society by George Bellas Greenough and William Babington, 3 March 1809.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints given to the Society, and collated together in a volume marked ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1808]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/7

Image reference: 05-82

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geognostische karte Sicilien (Hoffmann, 1839)

Title: Geognostische karte Sicilien: aus deu hiuterlasfeueu materialieu v. Prof. Friedr. Hoffmann

Creator: Friedrich Hoffmann

Description: Geological map of the Italian island of Sicily, at a scale of 1:500,000.

Publisher: Simon Schropp et comp.

Date: 1839

Format: Geological map

Image reference: 07-21

Size of original: 60 cm x 74 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 cm x 70 cm

‘Parallel roads of Glen Roy’

Title: ‘Parallel roads of Glen Roy’

Creator: James Skene (1775-1864)

Description: Drawing of the ‘Parallel roads of Glen Roy’, depicting a series of post-glacial shorelines created at the end of the Pleistocene epoch. This geological feature was extremely popular in the 19th century, with a number of the early geologists theorising as to its cause.

From a series of the earliest drawings, prints and paintings donated to the Society, and collated together in an album entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1809]

Format: Ink wash on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/5

Image reference: 05-81

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological map of Brough-under-Stainmore (Geological Survey of England & Wales, 1893)

Title: Brough under Stainmore

Creator: Sir Archibald Geikie, Geological Survey of England and Wales

Description: Geological map of the village of Brough under Stainmore in Cumbria, England, and the surrounding area, at a scale of one inch to the mile. It corresponds to Ordnance Survey sheet 102SE.

Publisher: Geological Survey of England and Wales

Date: 1893

Format: Geological map

Image reference: 07-10

Size of original: 44 cm x 62 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm

‘Synopsis of Geological Phenomena’

Title: ‘Synopsis of Geological Phenomena’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: ‘Synopsis of Geological Phenomena’, [printed by S Collingwood, Printer to the University], Oxford.

This broadsheet is an attempt by William Smith to set out how his stratigraphical theories fitted in with theological views about the creation of the Earth, in particular in relation to the biblical deluge.

The edge of the paper on the left side is trimmed very closely as it was originally bound within a volume of tracts in the Library collections.

Date: 22 June 1832

Format: Printed document

Archive reference: LDGSL/761

Image reference: 23-26

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

‘View of the Grauwacke rocks south of Eyemouth Berwickshire’

Title: ‘View of the Grauwacke rocks south of Eyemouth Berwickshire’

Creator: J Waldie

Description: Painting showing folding and distortion of ‘grauwacke’ (greywacke) rocks. Drawing presented to the Society by Richard Griffiths through Richard Kirwan.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints of geological subjects presented to the Society, and collated together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 1807

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/4

Image reference: 05-80

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Map of the Silurian Region (Murchison, 1838)

Title: Map of the Silurian Region and adjacent counties of England & Wales geologically illustrated…

Creator: Roderick Murchison (1792-1871)

Description: Geological map of ‘The Silurian region and adjacent counties of England & Wales geologically illustrated … from the Ordnance Survey coloured in the field during the years 1831-8’.

In 1839, Sir Roderick Impey Murchison published his seminal work ‘The Silurian system, founded on geological researches in the counties of Salop, Hereford, Radnor, Montgomery, Caermarthen, Brecon, Pembroke, Monmouth, Gloucester, Worcester and Stafford; with descriptions of the coal-fields and overlying formations’ (London: John Murray), which described the Silurian strata found in South Wales and the West Midlands of England. Included in the text was this map of Siluria as outlined by Murchison, the very first map of Silurian geology in the world.

Publisher: J Gardner

Date: [?1838]

Format: Geological map, ink and water-colours on paper.

Image reference: 07-19

Size of original:  95 cm x 148 cm.

Recommended print size: 100 x 70 cm

Table of the ‘Explanation of Colours on the Map of Strata…’

Title: ‘Explanation of Colours on the Map of Strata, taken in Succession from East to West, as the Strata occur.’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: The table was included in the early editions of the printed memoir which accompanied William Smith’s geological map ‘A Delineation of the Strata of England and Wales…’. Later editions saw the table being replaced by one of the revised versions of ‘A Geological Table of British Organized Fossils’.

Source: Smith, W, ‘A Memoir to the Map and Delineations of the Strata of England and Wales with part of Scotland’, 1815, plate II.

Format: Hand colouring on engraved base.

Image reference: 23-25

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Grauwacke rocks at Fass Castle in Berwickshire’

 

Title: ‘Grauwacke rocks at Fass Castle in Berwickshire’

Creator: J Waldie

Description: Painting showing folding of ‘grauwacke’ (greywacke) rocks. Drawing presented to the Society by Richard Griffiths, 7 April 1809.

From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints of geological subjects presented to the Society, and collated together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 1807

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/3

Image reference: 05-79

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Prospectus for ‘Accurate Delineations and Descriptions of the Natural Order of the Various Strata…’

Title: Prospectus for William Smith’s ‘Accurate Delineations and Descriptions of the Natural Order of the Various Strata…’

Creator: Printed by B McMillan for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Printed prospectus for William Smith’s projected published work, ‘Accurate Delineations and Descriptions of the Natural order of the Various Strata that are found in the Different Parts of England and Wales with Practical Observations Thereon’, 1 June 1801.

This small, four page prospectus advertised what would have been William Smith’s first publication, setting out his stratigraphical theories. The single volume work, which was to have been published by November 1802 at the price to subscribers of two guineas, was to be arranged under the separate headings of each strata with a map and sections in proper colours “to make them more striking and just representations of Nature”.

The prospectus provided an exhaustive list of professions who would find the work extremely useful, from philosophers, miners, artists, architects, glass-makers, chemists, colour-men, brick-makers to potters. “Indeed” claimed the prospectus “there are but few of the most necessary occupations of life, that may not derive from this Work some useful hint or improvement.”

In the end, the work was never published, principally due to the repeated bankruptcy of Smith’s publisher John Debrett.

The pamphlet was one of a number of items gifted by Smith to the Geological Society in 1831 in thanks to his being awarded the Wollaston Medal. The writing is Smith’s.

Source: The pamphlet has been pasted at the front of the Society’s copy of Smith’s ‘Stratigraphical System of Organized Fossils’ (1817), both for safekeeping and because parts of the proposed work were incorporated into this publication.

Image reference: 23-23

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

‘Scur Eigg in the Hebrides’

Title: ‘Scur Eigg in the Hebrides’

Creator: Probably James Skene (1775-1864)

Description: From a series of the earliest drawings, paintings and prints of geological subjects presented to the Society, and collated together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: [c.1809]

Format: Ink wash

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/01

Image reference: 05-78

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Plan of a Water-Meadow made out of part of a Bog…’

Title: ‘Plan of a Water-Meadow made out of part of a Bog on Prisley Farm which was attempted to be drained in 1795’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Water-meadows are areas of agricultural grassland where irrigation is strictly controlled through the use of sluice gates or hatches to feed in the water, which systematically drains through the meadow, with the excess passing into ditches and drains to be discharged into a river, or in this case a brook. The intention was to keep the ground damp, allowing multiple and larger yields of crops of higher quality of grass for sheep and cattle.

A Mr Elkington had attempted unsuccessfully to drain the Prisley Bog in 1795. Despite claiming that only one main drain would be necessary, it didn’t work and subsequent additional drains also made little difference. William Smith remarked that eight years later the appearance of the bog “would have induced a stranger to think that any drainage of it had ever been attempted.” Smith worked on the drainage of the Prisley Bog between 1802-1803.

Smith published an account of this successful project in a number journals of the day, but also included it in his first published memoir in 1806. This ‘treatise of irrigation’ is a rather wordy affair, with Smith frequently going off topic as well as taking the opportunity to include verses of his own poetry.

Source: ‘Observations on the Utility, Form and Management of Water Meadows and the Draining and Irrigation of Peat Bogs, with an Account of Prisley Bog and other Extraordinary Improvements, Conducted for His Grace the Duke of Bedford, Thomas William Coke, Esq,MP, and Others’, Norwich: Printed by R M Bacon for Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme (1806). Plate 2.

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 23-22

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

‘Staffa’

 

Title: Drawing of ‘Staffa’

Creator: James Skene (1775-1864)

Description: Monochrome wash drawing of Fingal’s Cave, Staffa, Inner Hebrides, Scotland. The drawing, along with two others, was given to the Geological Society by James Skene on 5 January 1810.

Date: [c.1809]

Format: Ink wash

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/6

Image reference: 05-77

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Section of the country east of Lake Baikal, Siberia (geology near Nerchinsk) (Austin, 1848-1862)

Title: Section of the country east of Lake Baikal, Siberia (geology near Nerchinsk)

Creator: Charles Edward Austin (1819-1893)

Description: Geological section of the mineral rich strata near Nerchinsk.

The section, plus a map, originally accompanied a paper read before the Society, 3 December 1862, an abridged version published as: Austin, C E. “Geological Notes on the Locality in Siberia where Fossil Fish and Estheriæ have been found: With a Note on Estheria Middendorfii; by Professor T. Rupert Jones, F.G.S.”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 19 (1863), pp71-74.

Charles Edward Austin, elected to the Society on 24 February 1858, was an English civil engineer who had worked under Brunel in the construction of the Great Western Railway. He travelled to Russia & Siberia between 1847-1848.

Date: [1848-1862]

Format: Watercolour & ink on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/266

Image reference: 09-34

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

‘Plan of a Water-Meadow made out of a Bog…’

Title: ‘Plan of a Water-Meadow made out of a Bog at Prisley Farm belonging to His Grace the Duke of Bedford’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Water-meadows are areas of agricultural grassland where irrigation is strictly controlled through the use of sluice gates or hatches to feed in the water, which systematically drains through the meadow, with the excess passing into ditches and drains to be discharged into a river, or in this case a brook. The intention was to keep the ground damp, allowing multiple and larger yields of crops of higher quality of grass for sheep and cattle.

William Smith worked on the drainage of the Prisley Bog between 1802-1803.

Smith published an account of this successful project in a number journals of the day, but also included it in his first published memoir in 1806. This ‘treatise of irrigation’ is a rather wordy affair, with Smith frequently going off topic as well as taking the opportunity to include verses of his own poetry.

Source: ‘Observations on the Utility, Form and Management of Water Meadows and the Draining and Irrigation of Peat Bogs, with an Account of Prisley Bog and other Extraordinary Improvements, Conducted for His Grace the Duke of Bedford, Thomas William Coke, Esq,MP, and Others’, Norwich: Printed by R M Bacon for Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme (1806). Plate 1.

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 23-21

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Section from London to Snowdon (Smith, 1817)

Title: Geological Section from London to Snowdon showing the Varieties of the Strata and the Correct Altitudes of the Hills

Creator: William Smith

Description:

Publisher: John Cary

 Date: 1817

 Format: Handcoloured. Printed on paper.

 Image reference: 07-108

Recommended print size: 70 x 50 cm.  Note because Smth’s sections are long an thin, all prints will contain large areas of whitespace to the top and bottom of the image.

Boulder rocks at Debre Doura, Kumaun, India

Title: Boulder rocks at Debre Doura, Kumaun, India

Creator: Captain Robert Gibney, Bengal Army

Description: View of two huge boulders at Debre Doura in Kumaun, India. In the accompanying letter, sent with the drawing in June 1859, Gibney describes the stones as being, “limestone and are from base to summit of about eighty feet in height, somewhat round in shape and…the elevation as taken with the thermometer was 7000 feet above sea level…”

Date: [1859]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/530

Image reference: 05-76

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Upper Oolite fossils

Title: Upper Oolite fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Upper Oolite stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-20

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological map of the mining district of Cornwall… (Thomas, 1819)

Title: ‘Geological map of the mining district of Cornwall between Camborne and Chasewater shewing the lodes, cross courses, adits, &c’

Creator: John Cary (1755-1835) for Richard Thomas (1779-1858)

Description: The map, along with two sections accompanied: ‘Report On A Survey Of The Mining District Of Cornwall From Chasewater To Camborne’ (1819).

Date: 1 July 1819

Format: Coloured engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/404/1

Image reference: 07-159

Size of original: 79 cm x 134 cm.

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm

Dyke on Great Cumbra, Western Isles, Scotland

Title: Dyke on Great Cumbra [Great Cumbrae], Western Isles, Scotland

Creator: James Smith of Jordanhill (1782-1867)

Description: Drawing of a dyke, probably on Great Cumbrae, an island in the Firth of Clyde, Ayrshire, Scotland. The drawing is captioned ‘Trap [granite], blackish in red sandstone’.

The drawing was one of three of the area, which accompanied Smith’s paper, “On a Split Boulder in Little Cumbra, Western Isles”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 18 (1862), pp162-164.

Date: [1861]

Format: Pencil

Archive reference: LDGSL/228

Image reference: 05-75

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Topographical [and Geological] Map of London… (Mylne, 1851)

Title: ‘Topographical [and Geological] Map of London and its Environs’

Creator: Robert William Mylne (1817-1890)

Description: Engraved by T Walsh, colour printed by J Aresti. Mounted on linen and dissected, 39 x 72cm.

According to the legend on the map, ‘The different colours represent the general surface soils. In the low Marshy grounds the Alluvial deposits (excepting Peat) are omitted – they vary from 3 to 6 feet in thickness. The Made Ground and accumulated debris occurring in the City & anciently populated parts adjacent is also omitted – it varies from 8 to 18 feet in thickness – in Westminster from 6 to 12 feet.’

Publisher: James Wyld, London.

Date: 1851

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 07-158

Size of original: 39 cm x 73 cm.

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Fullers Earth fossils

Title: Fullers Earth fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Fullers Earth stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-19

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Split boulder on Little Cumbra, Western Isles

Title: Split boulder on Little Cumbra [Little Cumbrae], Western Isles, Scotland

Creator: James Smith of Jordanhill (1782-1867)

Description: Drawing of a split boulder found on Little Cumbrae, an island in the Firth of Clyde, Ayrshire, Scotland. James Smith, in his paper to the Society, thought that it provided evidence of the existence of glaciers in the Clyde Valley. Stating in his paper, “The block is composed of trap, apparently the same as that of the island, but at such a distance from any neighbouring height as to preclude the supposition that it could have fallen from it. I see therefore no other hypothesis by which we can account for its present position than that of supposing that it must have fallen from an escarpment of ice.” Smith, J. “On a Split Boulder in Little Cumbra, Western Isles”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 18 (1862), pp162-164.

The drawing was one of three which accompanied Smith’s paper. The same figure appears in two of the drawings and may be a self portrait.

Date: [1861]

Format: Watercolour wash, pencil

Archive reference: LDGSL/228

Image reference: 05-74

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological map of Glamorgan (Greenough/Smith 1799-1818)

Title: Geological map of Glamorgan

Creator: George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855) and William Buckland (1784-1856)

Description: Rough geological colouring with ink and pencil annotations on base map ‘A Map of the County of Glamorgan from an actual survey’, by George Yates, of Liverpool, published by John Cary, 1799. Scale-1:63,360, 92cm x 144cm. The annotations are in the hand of George Bellas Greenough and William Buckland, a note on the top left states ‘This map has been corrected to Nov 1818’.

The map is likely to have been compiled as part of the research for George Bellas Greenough’s ‘Geological Map of England and Wales’ (1819/1820).

Date: 1799, up to November 1818

Format: Hand colouring on printed base map

Archive reference: LDGSL/947/6/E/1

Image reference: 07-157

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 90cm

Clay over the Upper Oolite fossils

Title: Clay over the Upper Oolite fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in Clay over the Upper Oolite stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-18

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Sukhoboisk, Samilovsky and Froloosky copper mines

Title: Sections of the Sukhoboisk, Samilovsky and Froloosky copper mines, north of Orenburg, Russia

Description: Manuscript, watercolour sections of the Sukhoboisk, Samilovsky and Froloosky copper mines, north of Orenburg, Russia, by unknown Russian author, copied from Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann’s collection. The captions, in English written over pencil notes in a Russian hand, are likely to be by William Thomas Horner Fox Strangways.

William Thomas Horner Fox Strangways, later 4th Earl of Ilchester ( 1795-1865) was an English diplomat, attached to the embassy at St Petersburg between December 1816 to June 1820.

Amongst a series of items on Russian geology which were either drawn or acquired by Strangways when he was attached to the embassy in St Petersburg, and sent to George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855). The labels by Greenough on the reverse indicate that all were copied from the ‘collection of [Benedikt Franz Johann von] Hermann’, another foreign geologist who was based in Russia.

Date: [1809-1820]

Format: Watercolour on paper, mounted on linen

Archive reference: LDGSL/995/7

Image reference: 08-24

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Split boulder on Little Cumbra, Western Isles

Title: Split boulder on Little Cumbra [Little Cumbrae], Western Isles, Scotland

Creator: James Smith of Jordanhill (1782-1867)

Description: Painting of split boulder found on Little Cumbrae, an island in the Firth of Clyde, Ayrshire, Scotland. James Smith, in his paper to the Society, thought that it provided evidence of the existence of glaciers in the Clyde Valley. Stating in his paper, “The block is composed of trap, apparently the same as that of the island, but at such a distance from any neighbouring height as to preclude the supposition that it could have fallen from it. I see therefore no other hypothesis by which we can account for its present position than that of supposing that it must have fallen from an escarpment of ice.” Smith, J. “On a Split Boulder in Little Cumbra, Western Isles”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 18 (1862), pp162-164.

The painting was one of three which accompanied Smith’s paper. The same figure appears in two of the drawings and may be a self portrait.

Date: [1861]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/228 watercolour

Image reference: 05-73

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Forest Marble fossils

Title: Forest Marble fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Forest Marble stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-17

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological map of Cumberland (Fry, c.1814)

Title: Geological map of Cumberland

Creator: Probably Joseph Harrison Fry (1777-1855)

Description: Geological colouring of the strata of Cumberland, on a base map by John Cary, 1793.

On the reverse, underneath the cloth on which the map has been mounted can be faintly seen the following annotation: ‘Cumberland geolog report by Mr Fryer’. In the Memoir to George Bellas Greenough’s ‘Geological Map of England & Wales’ (1820) he thanks Joseph H Fryer of Lysick Hall, Cumberland, who had sent him three maps of Cumberland, Westmorland and Durham ‘coloured according to the boundaries of their respective strata’ in 1814. This item is presumably one of these.

Date: Base map 1793, geological colouring c.1814.

Format: Watercolour on printed base.

Archive reference: LDGSL/947/6/D/2/1

Image reference: 07-155

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Granite outcrops in Kolyvan, Sibiera

Title: ‘Felsengruppen von Granit an see Kolywan’

Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print showing granite outcrops in Kolyvan, Siberia. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 10.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.

Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/411 pl 10

Image reference: 05-72

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Cornbrash fossils

Title: Cornbrash fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Cornbrash stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-16

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Kelloways Stone fossils

Title: Kelloways Stone fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Kelloways Stone stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

This plate depicts typical fossils found in Kelloways Stone, a stratum identified by Smith in 1800 when working on a drainage project in Wiltshire.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-15

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of England & Wales… [Greenough reduction] (Gardner after Greenough, 1826)

Title: ‘Geological Map of England and Wales reduced by permission from the map in 6 sheets published by the Geological Society’.

Creator: J Gardner after George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855)

Description: Reduced version of George Bellas Greenough’s ‘Geological Map of England and Wales’ (1820).

Publisher: J Gardner

Date: 21st July 1826

Format: Hand colouring on engraved base

Image reference: 07-152

Size of original: 72 cm x 57 cm

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

A New Geological Map of England & Wales… [Smith reduction] (Smith & Cary, 1827)

Title: ‘A New Geological Map of England and Wales, with the inland navigations; exhibiting the districts of coal and other sites of mineral tonnage.’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839) and John Cary (1755-1835)

Description: Following the poor sales of William Smith’s 1815 geological map ‘A Delineation of the Strata of England & Wales…’, his publisher John Cary issued a smaller version entitled ‘A New Geological Map of England and Wales, with the inland navigations; exhibiting the districts of coal and other sites of mineral tonnage’. The original 1815 Map measured (when joined) 259cm x 176cm at a scale of 5 miles to the inch, with the most basic edition available for the cost of £5 5s. This new ‘reduced’ map measured a more modest 74 cm x 60 cm, was at a scale of 15 miles to the inch and the cheapest edition could be had for 14 shillings – a far more commercial enterprise. How well the edition did is unclear, but it was known to have been reissued in 1820, 1824, 1827 and 1828.

The copy which the Society holds is from 1827 but is identical to the 1820 edition. It is sectioned and mounted on linen in order to fit into a handy pocket sized box – this is the travelling edition which would have cost 18 shillings when new.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1827

Format: Hand colouring on engraved base

Image reference: 07-151

Size of original: 78 cm x 64 cm

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm

Clunch Clay fossils

Title: Clunch Clay fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Clunch Clay stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-14

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Section from the Medway through Upnor to Cockham Wood (Dadd, 1833)

Title: ‘Section from the Medway through Upnor to Cockham Wood’

Creator: R Dadd [possibly Robert Dadd (1798-1843)]

Description: Geological ‘Section from the Medway through Upnor to Cockham Wood’, which accompanied a communication read before the Society, 15 May 1833, and published as: Dadd, R. “A Memoir on the Valley of the River Medway”, ‘Proceedings of the Geological Society of London’, vol 1 (1833), pp482-483. Section not published.

The section may be by Robert Dadd, father of the artist Richard Dadd, who was a known lecturer on geology in the Medway area. Dadd senior was murdered by his son in 1843, and Richard spent his remaining years in Bethlem and Broadmoor asylums.

Date: [1833]

Format: Ink and pencil on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/259

Image reference: 07-150

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm

Coral Rag fossils

Title: Coral Rag fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Coral Rag & Pisolite stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-13

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological Map of England & Wales. Sheet 10 Isle of Wight (Murchison, 1856)

Title: Geological Map of England and Wales.  Sheet 10.  Isle of Wight

Creator: Sir Roderick Impey Murchison

Description: This is one of the original, old series 1 mile to the inch maps published by the Geological Survey of England and Wales.  This particular sheet was by Sir Roderick Impey Murchison

Publisher: Geologcial Survey of England and Wales

Date: October 1856

Format: Geological map.  Watercolors and ink, base map lithographed form engraved plates.

Image reference: 07-14

Size of original: 63 cm. x 93 cm.

Recommended print size: 70 X 100cm

 

Coral Rag fossils

Title: Coral Rag fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Coral Rag & Pisolite stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-12

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Greenough’s copy of William Smith’s geological map (Smith with notes by Greenough, 1815/1818)

Title: Sheet 4 from William Smith’s geological map ‘A delineation of the strata of England and Wales, with part of Scotland…’ (1815)

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839), John Cary (1755-1835) and George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855)

Description: Sheet 4 of William Smith’s geological map ‘A delineation of the strata of England and Wales, with part of Scotland…’ (1815), showing the Irish Sea with geological colouring on the Isle of Man and parts of Scotland.

William Smith’s map is recognised as the first geological map of a complete country ever made. Smith had begun work on it in 1802 but progress was slow, so when a delegation of Members of the newly formed Geological Society, which included George Bellas Greenough, visited Smith in 1808 to see his fossil collection and maps, they were not overly impressed. Instead they decided that the Geological Society should produce its own official version.

The Society’s map, issued in 1820, was principally the work of Greenough who unlike Smith was not a field geologist. Instead he relied on others sending him information which he would then collate. Most controversially amongst his sources was William Smith’s map.

This sheet is from Greenough’s own copy of Smith’s map, and is notably annotated in pencil ‘This sheet can be of no further use to the Geol Map, Nov 1818’.

Date: 1815 & 1818

Format: Engraved on paper, mounted on cloth, hand colouring

Archive reference: LDGSL/1093

Image reference: 07-149

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Section of the Bath Easton Mine in Somersetshire (Webster, 1812)

Title: Section of the Bath Easton Mine in Somersetshire

Creator: Probably Thomas Webster (1772-1844)

Description: Manuscript section of the Bath Easton coal mine in Somersetshire.

Date: [1812]

Format: Ink on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/414/12

Image reference: 07-148

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

‘North Suter from South Suter’

Title: ‘North Suter [North Sutor] from South Suter [South Sutor], Cromarty’

Creator: Charles Henry Lardner Woodd (1823-1891)

Description: Drawing, ‘North Suter [North Sutor] from South Suter [South Sutor], Cromarty’. The caption notes that the geology is ‘Gneiss’. The Sutors of Cromarty are two opposing headlands which mark the entrance to the Cromarty Firth.

Charles Henry Lardner Woodd was elected a Fellow on 20 May 1846 but despite being a member until his death in 1893, never submitted a geological paper to the Society. However he was a gifted artist and this image one of a series of eight drawings in our collection, showing the geological features around Cromarty and Assynt in Scotland which were recorded throughout the month of August 1847 when Woodd appears to have been following in the footsteps of the famous Scottish geologist Hugh Miller (1802-1856).

Date: [?14] August 1847

Format: Watercolour and pencil

Archive reference: LDGSL/1043/7

Image reference: 05-67

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Section of the Bath Easton Coal Mine, Avon (Unknown, 1808?)

Title: Section of the Bath Easton Coal Mine, Avon

Creator: Unknown

Description: Section of strata of the Bath Easton Coal Mine, Avon. The item is thought to have been created to accompany an 1808 report by the Bath-Easton Coal Company which included a statement by William Smith concerning the strata passed through in sinking for coal at Batheaston, near Bath, see: Eyles, J M. “William Smith, a bibliography…”, ‘Journal of the Society for the Bibliography of Natural History’, vol 5 (1969), pp87-109. Item 8.

The Bath-Easton Coal Company was founded in 1804 by local landowner Thomas Walters who had been persuaded of the potential riches to be found on his property by an enterprising woman of the name of Mrs Mary Lane Browne. William Smith was hired to prospect for coal and his survey saw one of the first uses of his still rudimentary stratigraphical theories. Smith suggested that coal would be found below the Red Ground (marked near the bottom of the section). Unfortunately influxes of water from the nearby Bath Hot Springs led to problems, and the costs of the 30 horse-power then later 80 horse-power steam engines installed to overcome the issue, and the lack of any coal measures, saw the scheme abandoned in 1813.

The section was presented to the Society by Thomas Meade, Honorary Member, on 2 February 1810.

Date: [?1808]

Format: Hand coloured engraving with ink and pencil annotations.

Archive reference: LDGSL/415

Image reference: 07-147

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Oak Tree Clay fossils

Title: Oak Tree Clay fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Oak Tree Clay stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-11

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Cape Wrath’

Title: ‘Cape Wrath’

Creator: Charles Henry Lardner Woodd (1823-1891)

Description: Drawing, ‘Cape Wrath’, Sutherland. The caption notes that the geology is ‘Gneiss with granite veins’. Cape Wrath is the most north-westerly part of Scotland.

Charles Henry Lardner Woodd was elected a Fellow on 20 May 1846 but despite being a member until his death in 1893, never submitted a geological paper to the Society. However he was a gifted artist and this image one of a series of eight drawings in our collection, showing the geological features around Cromarty and Assynt in Scotland which were recorded throughout the month of August 1847 when Woodd appears to have been following in the footsteps of the famous Scottish geologist Hugh Miller (1802-1856).

Date: 23 August 1847

Format: Watercolour and pencil

Archive reference: LDGSL/1043/6

Image reference: 05-66

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

A New Map of South Wales (Greenough and Coltman, between 1813-1839)

Title: ‘A New Map of South Wales’

Creator: George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855) and Nathaniel Coltman

Description: Geological colouring and extensive notes by George Bellas Greenough, on topographical base map ‘A New Map of South Wales’, by Nathaniel Coltman, published by Laurie & Whittle, 4th edition, 1813. Scale-1:300,000. Dissected on cloth in case.

The geological colouring and notes are not dated, but there are at least two notes which cite publications from 1814 & 1832, and part of the colouring is clearly based on the work of Roderick Impey Murchison from the late 1830s. The map is cited in the following article: North, F J, “From the Geological Map to the Geological Survey”, ‘Transactions of the Cardiff Naturalists Society’ vol. 65 (1932), as being used in drafting the first edition of George Bellas Greenough’s ‘Map of England and Wales’ (1819), however this is probably due to the colouring mistakingly being dated as contemporary with the base map. It may have been used, however, as a draft for the second edition of Greenough’s map (1839).

Date: Base map 1813, colouring [c.1813-1839]

Format: Watercolour on engraved base

Archive reference: LDGSL/1008/58

Image reference: 07-146

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Portland Stone fossils

Title: Portland Stone fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Portland Stone stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-10

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Sections and plan of the collieries around Nailsea (Martin and Smith, 1811)

Title: Sections and plans of the collieries around Nailsea

Creator: ?Edward Martin (d.1818)

Description: Sections and plans of the collieries around Nailsea, which accompanied the pamphlet ‘The Reports of Mr William Smith, and Mr Edward Martin, to the Bristol and Taunton Canal Company’, (1818).

In the report, Smith was of the opinion that there was a sufficient supply of workable coal to justify the construction of a new canal. Only the Bridgewater-Taunton part of the canal was constructed, opening in 1827.

Date: 1 July 1811

Format: Engraving on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/745

Image reference: 07-144

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

‘Cunaig in Assynt, Sutherlandshire’

Title: ‘Cunaig [Quinag] in Assynt, Sutherlandshire’

Creator: Charles Henry Lardner Woodd (1823-1891)

Description: Drawing, ‘Cunaig in Assynt, Sutherlandshire’. The caption notes the geology as being, ‘Great conglomerate, quartz rocks in foreground, white as snow’.

Charles Henry Lardner Woodd was elected a Fellow on 20 May 1846 but despite being a member until his death in 1893, never submitted a geological paper to the Society. However he was a gifted artist and this image one of a series of eight drawings in our collection, showing the geological features around Cromarty and Assynt in Scotland which were recorded throughout the month of August 1847 when Woodd appears to have been following in the footsteps of the famous Scottish geologist Hugh Miller (1802-1856).

Date: 20 August 1847

Format: Watercolour and pencil

Archive reference: LDGSL/1043/2

Image reference: 05-65

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Brick Earth fossils

Title: Brick Earth fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Brick Earth stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-09

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Stratification in Hackness Hills (Smith, 1832)

Title: ‘Stratification in Hackness Hills’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: This map, the ‘Stratification in Hackness Hills’, is William Smith’s last major work. Undertaken when he employed as a land steward to Sir John Johnstone, it was drawn at a scale of 6 ½ inches to the mile and is considered to be one of the earliest large scale geological maps constructed.

The base map is lithographed by W Day of Lincoln Inn Fields, London and is of a rougher quality than Smith’s earlier published maps by John Cary. Present, however, is his distinctive fading colouring technique to delineate the outcrops of strata. Very few of these maps were produced and it could be that Smith himself undertook the colouring.

Smith explained the map in an accompanying memoir:

“The principal object of the annexed map is a delineation of the GEOLOGICAL structure of some of the most irregular ground in England, namely, that around Hackness Hall. The valleys of this District, with their intermediate ridges of hills, both in form and Geological construction, may be considered unique….On Knox’s excellent map of the vicinity of Scarborough those forms are well depicted and may be readily compared. The form of Hackness valleys comprised within the high land of Suffield, Silpho and Broxa, which is Geologically insular, may be compared to the branchings of a stag’s horn. And no one can understand the intricate forms in the surface of this ground without traversing the hills as well as the valleys; for on riding along the high side of the elevated plane of Silpho and Broxa moors, even the ends of the valleys are not discernible. Such is the ground of which we have to show the Geological construction composed of insulated parts of some of the most regular strata in the British series….”

Like Smith’s other work, the aim of geologically mapping the Hackness area was to demonstrate the subject’s utility to others, in this case the agricultural industry, “That a knowledge of Geology is the only infallible guide to determine correctly the value of land….To know what plants are best suited to the soil a knowledge of the varieties of soil is necessary, which can only be obtained by an acquaintance with their subsoils and beds of strata upon which they rest, and from which they are respectively formed.”

Date: 1832

Format: Hand colouring on lithograph base map on paper.

Archive reference: LDGSL/751

Image reference: 07-143

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Green Sand fossils

Title: Green Sand fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Green Sand stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-08

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Geology, familiarly illustrated’

 

 
Title: Cover of ‘Geology, familiarly illustrated’

Creator: Mrs Catherine M Weber

Description: Front cover of concertina booklet ‘Geology, familiarly illustrated’, printed and published by J B Goodinge, Aldersgate Street, London, 1859. The volume contains an uncoloured, lithographed, illustrated panorama of a humorous take on British stratigraphy.

Date: 1859

Format: Lithograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/921

Image reference: 24-01

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

William Smith’s Table of Strata… under UVA light (Smith original 1799, UVA negative 1972)

Title: William Smith’s Table of Strata in the Vicinity of Bath under UVA light

Creator: John Wesley Judd (1840-1916) after William Smith (1769-1839) & Benjamin Richardson (1758-1832)

Description: Photograph of the manuscript table listing the strata in the vicinity of Bath by William Smith, which was written to his dictation by the Reverend Benjamin Richardson in 1799, taken under UVA light.

The item hung in the library until c.1980s. Light has faded the text and the iron gall ink has bled, further exacerbated by its frequent varnishing over the years.

Date: 1799 & 1972

Format: Black and white glass plate negative

Archive reference: LDGSL/741 [original]

Image reference: 07-142

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

‘General Map of Strata…’ under infrared light (Smith, 1801 – negative created 1972)

Title: ‘General map of strata…’ under infrared light

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839) [original]

Description: Photograph of William Smith’s ‘General map of strata found in England & Wales’, taken under infrared light.

Infrared light is used to show up ink marks on faded documents. The original map hung in the library until c.1980s. Light has faded the colouring and base map, which is further exacerbated by its frequent varnishing over the years.

Date: 1801 & 1972

Format: Black and white glass plate negative

Archive reference: LDGSL/740 [original]

Image reference: 07-141

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

 

Green Sand fossils

Title: Green Sand fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Green Sand stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-07

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Reproduction of William Smith’s Table of Strata… (Judd after Smith & Richardson, 1897)

Title: Reproduction of William Smith’s Table of Strata in the Vicinity of Bath

Creator: John Wesley Judd (1840-1916) after William Smith (1769-1839) & Benjamin Richardson (1758-1832)

Description: Photographic facsimile of the manuscript table listing the strata in the vicinity of Bath by William Smith, which was written to his dictation by the Reverend Benjamin Richardson in 1799.

A reconstruction of the table was commissioned by Judd for his paper “William Smith’s manuscript maps”, ‘Geological Magazine’, vol 4 (1897), pp439-447, as the originals were faded.

Date: 1799 & 1897

Format: Photograph on board

Archive reference: LDGSL/744

Image reference: 07-140

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Lower Chalk fossils

Title: Lower Chalk fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Lower Chalk stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-06

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Map of New Zealand (James Hector, 1873)

Title: Geological sketch map of New Zealand

Creator: James Hector (1834-1907)

Description: Geological sketch map of New Zealand constructed from official surveys and the explorations of Dr. F. van Hochstetter, Dr. Julius Hast and others.

Publisher: unknown

Date: 1873

Format: Map

Image reference: 07-13

Size of original: 83 cm. x 54 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 x 70 cm

Upper Chalk fossils

Title: Upper Chalk fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Upper Chalk stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-05

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Table of Strata in the Vicinity of Bath (Smith & Richardson, 1799)

Title: Table of Strata in the Vicinity of Bath

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839) & Benjamin Richardson (1758-1832)

Description: Manuscript table listing the strata in the vicinity of Bath by William Smith, and written to his dictation by the Reverend Benjamin Richardson.

This unique, rather faded manuscript table is William Smith’s first attempt to lay down the order of the layers or rock, or strata, which he observed in Bath. Dictated by Smith, and in the handwriting of the Reverend Benjamin Richardson (1758-1832), it was one of a number of items gifted by Smith to the Geological Society in 1831 in thanks to his being given the Wollaston Medal.

Smith had met Richardson during the Annual Meeting of the Bath Agricultural Society in 1799. On viewing Richardson’s fossil collection at his residence in the city, Smith began pointing out to which beds they exclusively belonged. He later demonstrated the theory to Richardson’s astonishment out in the field. Keen that his discovery be communicated, Smith urged Richardson to write to his friend the Reverend Joseph Townsend (1739-1816) of Pewsey (who was also in Bath) who was equally astounded. Townsend had been studying the subject for nearly 50 years and had travelled all over Europe, but stated that no-one of his acquaintance knew of it either. The Table was created by the three men after dinner, when it was proposed that they should write down a tabular view of the subject. Each man took a copy of the table, with Smith annotating this version, “This Table of Strata, dictated by myself, is in the handwriting of the Rev Ben[jamin] Richardson, and was first reduced to writing at the house of the Rev Joseph Townsend, Pulteney St, Bath, 1799. William Smith.”

The Table is very faded and illegible due to it being hung proudly on the walls of the Society until the 1980s. Preservation techniques in the 19th and early 20th century unfortunately involved the generous use of varnish which has since discoloured. Additionally the original iron gall ink has burnt into the paper, further exacerbating the illegibility.

Date: 1799

Format: Ink on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/741

Image reference: 07-139

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

‘Craig’ [Crag] fossils

Title: ‘Craig’ [Crag] fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the Crag stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-04

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Reconstruction of William Smith’s “General Map of Strata found in England & Wales” (Judd & Reekes, 1897)

Title: Reconstruction of William Smith’s ‘General Map of Strata found in England & Wales’

Creator: John Wesley Judd (1840-1916) and Margaret Reekes after William Smith

Description: Photographic facsimile of William Smith’s general map of strata (1801), commissioned by John Wesley Judd, and coloured by Miss Margaret Reekes, 1897.

Reconstructions of the map alongside Smith’s circular map of Bath and Table of Strata were commissioned by Judd for his paper “William Smith’s manuscript maps”, ‘Geological Magazine’, vol 4 (1897), pp439-447, as the originals were faded.

No colour key is provided but Judd coloured his reproduction (based on Smith’s known palette) as follows:

1.GREEN – Chalk

2.PURPLE – ‘Sand of the Portland Rock’ with which is confounded the Carstone of Norfolk

3.GREY – Oxford Clay (or ‘Church Clay’ as Smith referred to it)

4.YELLOW – Oolite, showing the outcrop of the Great Oolite of the Bath area and the Inferior Oolite both south and north of that area

5.DULL BLUE – Lias

6.LIGHT RED – Trias and Permian (or ‘Red Marl’ of Smith)

7.BRIGHT BLUE – Carboniferous Limestone, with which is confounded the Magnesian Limestone

8.REDDISH-BROWN – Old Red Sandstone

Black cross + colliery

Three dots ∴ mine

Diamond ◆ slate

Date: 1801, 1897

Format: Hand colouring on photographic reproduction on board

Archive reference: LDGSL/743

Image reference: 07-138

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

Geological Map of the country east of Lake Baikal, Siberia

Title: Geological Map of the country east of Lake Baikal, Siberia

Creator: Charles Edward Austin (1819-1893)

Description: Composite photograph of the very large map (c. 2m long) of the country east of Lake Baikal, Siberia, Russia.

The map & section originally accompanied a paper read before the Society, 3 December 1862, an abridged version published as: Austin, C E. “Geological Notes on the Locality in Siberia where Fossil Fish and Estheriæ have been found: With a Note on Estheria Middendorfii; by Professor T. Rupert Jones, F.G.S.”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 19 (1863), pp71-74.

Charles Edward Austin, elected to the Society on 24 February 1858, was an English civil engineer who had worked under Brunel in the construction of the Great Western Railway. He travelled to Russia & Siberia between 1847-1848.

Date: [1848-1862]

Format: Watercolour & ink on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/266

Image reference: 09-33

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm [note: the image is a composite photograph which is indicated in the joins]

London Clay fossils

Title: London Clay fossils

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depictions of characteristic fossils found in the London Clay stratum.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his map 1815 of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-03

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

General map of strata found in England & Wales (Smith 1794/1801)

Title: ‘General map of strata found in England & Wales’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: ‘General map of strata found in England & Wales’, comprising geological colouring on a printed index map of England and Wales from ‘A general atlas’ by Robert Wilkinson, 1794.

The map and two other items were presented to the Society by Smith, February 1831, in gratitude at being awarded the Society’s first Wollaston Medal. An inscription by Smith is on the bottom right hand corner.

The map hung in the library until c.1980s. Light has faded the colouring and base map, which is further exacerbated by its frequent varnishing over the years.

Date: 1794 & 1801

Format: Hand colouring on printed base map

Archive reference: LDGSL/740

Image reference: 07-137

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

Roderick Murchison’s Russian ‘passport’

Title: Roderick Murchison’s Russian ‘passport’

Description: Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

The results of his fieldtrips were published as: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Date: 1843

Format: Printed paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/866

Image reference: 09-32

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Tooth of a Mastodon

Title: Fossil tooth [of a Mastodon]

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822) for William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Depiction of a ‘singular fossil tooth, of some extinct monstrous unknown animal, which is opalized…found in Norfolk.

Source: Smith, William, ‘Strata Identified by Organized Fossils, Containing Prints on Colored Paper of the Most Characteristic Specimens in Each Stratum’, London: W Arding, (1816-1819).

Smith was the first person to recognise the importance of fossils in identifying strata of equivalent age, thus enabling rocks to be correlated across country. His work as a surveyor and engineer involved him travelling up and down the country during which he accumulated a large collection of ‘characteristic’ fossils of the British strata. By 1815, his financial problems (caused in part by a bad investment in a quarrying concern in Bath) led to the sale of his precious fossil collection to the British Museum. This publication is part catalogue/part explanation of his collection and theories, the illustrations (by the natural history illustrator James Sowerby) printed on coloured paper to correlate with the geological colouring on his 1815 map of England and Wales.

Format: Hand coloured engraving

Image reference: 23-02

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Deductions from established facts in geology’

 

Title: ‘Deductions from established facts in geology’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Printed broadsheet, ‘Deductions from established facts in geology…’, by William Smith and printed by C R Todd, Scarborough.

Religious concepts, for some, influenced geological thinking during the first half of the 19th century. Many of the Society’s members were Anglican clerics or held deep theological beliefs and saw the science as a way of explaining the creation of the Earth, for instance observations of vast areas of the Earth being covered in water were interpreted as the Noachian flood but later ascribed to glaciers, that is the Ice Age. Fossils, in this context, were termed ‘Medals of Creation’.

William Smith, towards the end of his life, produced the above broadsheet which tabulated how his stratigraphical theories fitted in with theological views about the creation of the Earth.

“As doubts may remain in the minds of many of the PRINCIPLES OF GEOLOGY, I shall endeavour to exhibit the principles, long familiar to my mind, in a clear view, opened by the organized Fossils, which are the medals of Creation, the antiquities of nature, and records of time.

It is certain that by the use of these in Geology, we are carried back into a region of supernatural events, not merely to believe, but to see much of what there occurred; yet beyond a certain extent we cannot go; therefore we must be content to pass over the primitial interior of the Earth, and see that in the Stratification there have been CONSECUTIVE CREATIONS and DESTRUCTIONS under water which may be thus arranged.”

Smith theorised that there were distinct ‘orders of things’ which were subject to ‘supernatural events’ which repeatedly created and destroyed each strata of life in turn.
Date: 21 July 1835

Format: Printed text on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/752

Image reference: 23-01

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Reconstruction of William Smith’s Geological Map of Bath (1799) (Lam, 2014)

Title: Reconstruction of William Smith’s Geological Map of Bath (1799)

Creator: Caroline Lam, Archivist, Geological Society. With thanks to Dan Brown, Bath in Time (www.bathintime.co.uk). Derived in part from material provided by the British Geological Survey © NERC and Bath Central Library

Description: Reconstruction of William Smith’s geological map of Bath (1799) in order to illustrate how the image may have looked when first created.

William Smith donated the original map in 1831, but years of varnishing and being hung on walls has meant that the item is very faded.

For this reconstruction, the geological colouring has been taken from the facsimile commissioned by John Wesley Judd (and coloured by Miss Margaret Reekes) in 1897, which has been laid over a copy of ‘A Map of Five Miles round the City of Bath…1799’, and subsequently enhanced. Created for the William Smith Bicentenary in 2015.

According to John Wesley Judd, “Though no lines are drawn, Smith’s well-known method of colouring the base of a formation with a deep tint, and shading this upwards towards the outcrop of the next overlying stratum, enables us to see how carefully he had mapped all the geological lines around Bath. There are only three colours employed on the map and no index; but it is evident that the yellow tint represents the Bath Oolite, the base of the freestones being very accurately mapped so that even the smallest outlines can be made out agreeing most closely with the map of the Geological Survey; a blue tint is drawn at the base of the Lias, and a red one at the base of the Trias, the inliers of Carboniferous being left blank”

Date: 1799, 1897, 2014

Format: Digital file

Archive reference: LDGSL/742a

Image reference: 07-136

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Roderick Murchison’s Russian ‘passport’

Title: Roderick Murchison’s Russian ‘passport’

Description: Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

The results of his fieldtrips were published as: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Date: 1843

Format: Printed paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/866

Image reference: 09-31

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Pterichthys cornutus Agassiz

 

Title: Watercolour of Pterichthys cornutus Agassiz

Creator: Joseph Dinkel [1806-1891]

Description: Study of a complete specimen of the fossil fish Pterichthys cornutus Agassiz.

The fossil was found in Lethen Bar, Nairnshire, and was from the collection of William Willoughby Cole, 3rd Earl of Enniskillen.

Published in: Agassiz, J L R. ‘Monographie des Poissons Fossiles du Vieux Grès Rouge’ (1844-1845), Tab 2, fig 5.

Date: [c.1840-1844]

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/616/2/6/1

Image reference: 16-06

Original size: 38cm x 22.4cm.

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Roderick Murchison’s travel permit for Russia

Title: Travel permit for Russia

Description: Travel permit, issued by Tsar Nicholas I, to Roderick Murchison, allowing him to travel in Russia.

Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

The results of his fieldtrips were published as: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Date: 6 August 1845

Format: Printed paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/866

Image reference: 09-30

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Geological Map of Bath (Smith, 1799)

Title: Geological Map of Bath

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Geological colouring by William Smith, on base map ‘A Map of Five Miles round the City of Bath, on a scale of one inch and a half to a mile, from an Actual Survey, including all the new roads, with Alterations and Improvements to the present time, 1799’. Printed for and sold by A Taylor and W Nayler, Booksellers, Bath.

The map and two other items were presented to the Society by Smith, February 1831, in gratitude at being awarded the Society’s first Wollaston Medal. An inscription by Smith is on the bottom right hand corner.

The map hung in the library until c.1980s. Light has faded the colouring and base map, which is further exacerbated by its frequent varnishing over the years.

Date: 1799

Format: Hand colouring on engraved base map.

Archive reference: LDGSL/739

Image reference: 07-135

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Jurievetz & Kinschina on the Volga

Title: Jurievetz & Kinschina on the Volga

Creator: Roderick Impey Murchison (1792-1871)

Description: From a scrapbook entitled ‘Scenes in the Ural’, a collection of watercolours, lithographs, drawings and letters compiled by Roderick Impey Murchison, relating to his travels in Russia between 1840-1845. The majority of the lithographs, and some of the drawings on which the lithographs are based, were published in: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

Date: [1840-1845]

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/1072/07

Image reference: 09-29

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Original box and label for a ‘Geological Map of Durham’ (1831)

 

 

 

Title: Original box and label for a ‘Geological Map of Durham’

Creator: George & John Cary

Description: Original box for a ‘A New Map of Durham divided into Wards, exhibiting its Roads, Rivers, Parks, &c’.

The label states ‘Geological map of Durham: on which are delineated by colours, the courses and width of the strata which occasion the varieties of soils; calculated to elucidate the agriculture of the county, to show the situation of the best materials for building, making roads, constructing canals, &c and pointing out those places where coal and other valuable minerals are likely to be found.’

The geological colouring is William Smith’s (1769-1839) but is no longer acknowledged on this later issue of the map. This map belonged to George Bellas Greenough.

Date: 1831

Archive reference: LDGSL/1008/180

Image reference: 07-134a

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

‘Rock, Fortress and monastery of Verkoturie’

Title: “Rock, Fortress and monastery of Verkoturie”

Creator: Day & Haghe after drawing by Roderick Impey Murchison (1792-1871) & Haghe.

Description: From a scrapbook entitled ‘Scenes in the Ural’, a collection of watercolours, lithographs, drawings and letters compiled by Roderick Impey Murchison, relating to his travels in Russia between 1840-1845. The majority of the lithographs, and some of the drawings on which the lithographs are based, were published in: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

Date: [1845]

Format: Lithograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/1072/6

Image reference: 09-28

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Balagan in the Forests of the N Ural’

Title: “‘Balagan’ in the Forests of the N Ural (night scene) near Katchnakar”

Creator: Roderick Impey Murchison (1792-1871)

Description: From a scrapbook entitled ‘Scenes in the Ural’, a collection of watercolours, lithographs, drawings and letters compiled by Roderick Impey Murchison, relating to his travels in Russia between 1840-1845. The majority of the lithographs, and some of the drawings on which the lithographs are based, were published in: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

Date: [1840-1845]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/1072/5

Image reference: 09-27

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Greenough’s Map of Westmoreland (Greenough after Smith, 1824-1843)

 

 

Title: Greenough’s Map of Westmoreland

Creator: George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855) after William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Geological colouring, probably by George Bellas Greenough, on base map ‘A New Map of Westmorland divided into wards’, published by John Cary, 1811. Sectioned and on cloth.

The map has extensive manuscript notes by Greenough in which he states that the colouring “…has been corrected after Smith’s published in 1824 but is now too confused and ?indistinct to be of any use – the strata has been laid in correctly in my geol. map of England and revised by [Adam] Sedgwick.”

The map was part of the collection of George Bellas Greenough, given to the Society in 1856.

Date: [1824-1843]

Format: Hand colouring on engraved base map.

Archive reference: LDGSL/947/6/D/3/3

Image reference: 07-133

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

‘From the Katchnakar – looking north’

Title: ‘From the Katchnakar – looking north’

Creator: Roderick Impey Murchison (1792-1871)

Description: From a scrapbook entitled ‘Scenes in the Ural’, a collection of watercolours, lithographs, drawings and letters compiled by Roderick Impey Murchison, relating to his travels in Russia between 1840-1845. The majority of the lithographs, and some of the drawings on which the lithographs are based, were published in: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

Date: [1840-1845]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/1072/3

Image reference: 09-26

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Summit of the Ural E of Zlatoust’

Title: “Summit of the Ural E of Zlatoust (The Grand Duke Heretier sat on the peak (a) (Quartz Rock’)”

Creator: Roderick Impey Murchison (1792-1871)

Description: From a scrapbook entitled ‘Scenes in the Ural’, a collection of watercolours, lithographs, drawings and letters compiled by Roderick Impey Murchison, relating to his travels in Russia between 1840-1845. The majority of the lithographs, and some of the drawings on which the lithographs are based, were published in: Murchison, R I, ‘The geology of Russia in Europe and the Ural Mountains’, London: John Murray (1845).

Murchison, was elected to the Society on 3 December 1824, was a Scottish geologist who famously travelled in Russia between 1840 and 1845 to study its Palaeozoic rocks. His studies in Russia resulted in his defining a third geological system – the Permian, named after Perm – to add to the two he had already classified – the Silurian and the Devonian.

Date: [1840-1845]

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/1072/4

Image reference: 09-25

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Geological map of Scarborough (Smith, 1831)

Title: Geological map of Scarborough

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Geological colouring by William Smith, on the base map ‘A map of the country round Scarborough in the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire from actual trigonometrical survey with topographical geological and antiquarian descriptions by Robert Knox of Scarborough, published June 1, 1821’. Signed and dated by Smith on the bottom right hand corner.

Smith retired to Scarborough in 1834, but had close associations with the seaside town from 1820. The above map is one of Smith’s last completed geological works.

The difference in the colouring is very subtle and there is no colour key, instead the strata is labelled around the edges:

Light blue – Sandstone, shale & coal

Yellow – Grey or Bath Oolite

Red – Dogger or Inferior Oolite

Grey – Alum or Lias Shale

Green – Chalk

Light brown – Hackness or Kelloways Rock

Mid brown – Calcareous Grit

Mid blue – Oxford Clay

Greyish blue – Kimmeridge Clay

Light orange – Coralline Oolite

Date: 1831

Format: Hand colouring on printed base map.

Archive reference: LDGSL/750

Image reference: 07-131

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm

‘The seven churches in the County of Wicklow Ireland’

Title: ‘The seven churches in the County of Wicklow Ireland’

Creator: T Rider after Paul Sandby ([1731]-1809)

Description: Print, ‘The seven churches in the County of Wicklow Ireland’.

From a series of the earliest prints, paintings and drawings given to the Society and bound together in a volume entitled ‘Drawings I’.

Date: 2 February 1778

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/400/26

Image reference: 09-24

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

Plan of the ‘Proposed Aire & Dunn Canal’ (Smith and Phillips, 1819)

Title: Plan of the ‘Proposed Aire and Dunn Canal’.

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839) and John Phillips (1800-1874)

Description: Printed plan of ‘The Proposed Aire and Dunn Canal to drain the contiguous Lands and to shorten and connect the present navigations’, by William Smith, Engineer, 1819. Drawn on stone by J[ohn] Phillips.

The lithograph map was drawn by William Smith’s nephew John Phillips who had set up a small (short lived) printing business out of his uncle’s house in Buckingham Street, London.

The bill for the proposed canal was brought before the House of Commons in April 1819, but was rejected. The canal was never constructed.

Date: 1819

Format: Lithograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/748

Image reference: 07-130

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

‘General view of Port Des Moulins in the Isle of Sercq’

Title: ‘General view of Port Des Moulins in the Isle of Sercq’

Creator: M Barenger after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘General view of Port Des Moulins in the Isle of Sercq’. Published as one of the illustrations to accompany John MacCulloch’s paper “Account of Guernsey, and the other Channel Islands”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Volume 1 (1811), pp1-22, plate IV.

Caption printed in the ‘Transactions…’ states the print “is a general view of Port des Moulins. The rocks on the right hand are of grauwacke-slate, as also are the three insulated buttress-like rocks that appear in the distance. Behind the two furthest of these is situated the granite-vein represented in PL 3: the steatitical vein described in the Memoir lies also among the distant cliffs.

Date: 1811

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/1/3

Image reference: 05-50

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Old Dopper’s Farm, in the Rhenosterberg mountains, South Africa

 

 
Title: Old Dopper’s Farm, in the Rhenosterberg mountains, South Africa

Creator: George William Stow (1822-1882)

Description: View of Old Dopper’s Farm, in the Rhenosterberg mountains, South Africa.

Accompanied paper read before the Society, 3 November 1858, and published as: Stow, G W. “On some Fossils from South Africa”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 15 (1859), pp193-195. Illustrations not published.

Date: 1858

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/205

Image reference: 09-23

Recommended print size: Up to A4 (30 x 20cm)

View of the Rhenosterberg mountains, South Africa

Title: View of the Rhenosterberg mountains, South Africa

Creator: George William Stow (1822-1882)

Description: View of the Rhenosterberg mountains, South Africa.

Accompanied paper read before the Society, 3 November 1858, and published as: Stow, G W. “On some Fossils from South Africa”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 15 (1859), pp193-195. Illustrations not published.

Date: 1858

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/205

Image reference: 09-22

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

‘View of the Coupee in the Isle of Sercq’

Title: ‘View of the Coupee in the Isle of Sercq’

Creator: M Barenger after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘View of the Coupee in the Isle of Sercq’. Published as one of the illustrations to accompany John MacCulloch’s paper “Account of Guernsey, and the other Channel Islands”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Volume 1 (1811), pp1-22, plate II.

Caption printed in the ‘Transactions…’ states the print “is a view of the Coupee in the Isle of Sercq, taken from the smaller division of the island, called Petit Sercq. That part of the isthmus, the furthest from the spectator, is traversed by the soft vein mentioned in the Memoir, and is rapidly wearing down.”

Date: 1811

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/1/2

Image reference: 05-49

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Geological table of British organized fossils…’

Title: ‘Geological table of British organized fossils…’

Creator: William Smith (1769-1839)

Description: Printed table, ‘Geological table of British organized fossils, which identify the course and continuity of the Strata in their order of superposition; as originally discovered by W Smith, Civil Engineer; with reference to his Geological Map of England and Wales’. Sold by John Cary, 181 The Strand, London.

Date: [1817]

Format: Printed item with hand colouring.

Archive reference: LDGSL/747

Image reference: 07-128

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Mount Beshtau, Russia

Title: Vue du Mont Beschtau du Coté de l’Orient près de la Rivière Essentouk (‘View of the east side of Mount Beshtau, near the river Essentouk’)

Creator: Baron von Vittinghoff, J Matthes

Description: Etching showing the five peaks of Mount Beshtau, which gives its name to the city of Pyatigorsk (‘five mountains’ in Russian), Stavropol Krai, in the North Caucasus region of Russia. Other mountains, named in the picture’s caption, can be seen in the background.

The image was drawn by Baron von Vittinghoff and etched by J Matthes. It was presented to the Geological Society by the Baron on 6th November 1818.

Date: c.1818

Format: Coloured etching

Archive reference: LDGSL/524

Image reference: 09-21

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘View of the Creux in the Isle of Sercq’

Title: ‘View of the Creux in the Isle of Sercq’

Creator: M Barenger after John MacCulloch (1773-1835)

Description: Print, ‘View of the Creux in the Isle of Sercq’. Published as one of the illustrations to accompany John MacCulloch’s paper “Account of Guernsey, and the other Channel Islands”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 1, Volume 1 (1811), pp1-22, plate I.

Caption in ‘Transactions…’ states that the print “is a view of the small port and beach of the Creux in the Isle of Sercq, exhibiting the gate of the Tunnel, through which is the only entrance into the island. The adjacent rocks are of trap, and in the distance is seen a detached mass of granite.”

Date: 1811

Format:Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/1/1

Image reference: 05-48

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Dieng Plateau, Java

Title: Plateau-Diëng (‘Dieng plateau’)

Creator: Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, Winckelmann & Söhne

Description: Lithograph of the Dieng plateau on the island of Java, Indonesia. It is a marshy plateau in the Dieng volcanic complex. To the left of the picture is one of the Dieng temples – there are eight of these, but it is thought that in the past there were as many as 400, built during the 7th-9th centuries. When they were rediscovered in the 19th century, they were partially submerged in a lake.

Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, a German-Dutch botanist, came to Java as a surgeon in the Dutch colonial army whilst fleeing a ten year prison sentence for murdering a rival in a duel. He settled on the island and lived there for most of the rest of his life, making extensive studies of the land and its people.

This image was drawn by Junghuhn and lithographed by Winckelmann & Söhne. It was published in Junghuhn’s Landschaften-Atlas zu Java, which accompanied his four volume Java: deszelfs gedaante, bekleeding en inwendige struktuur (Java: its shape, vegetation cover and inner construction), (Amsterdam: PN Van Kampen, 1850-1854).

Date: [1850-1854]

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 09-20a

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

‘Extract of a letter from St Petersburg’

Title: ‘Extract of a letter from St Petersburg’

Creator: Alexander Crichton, later Sir Alexander Crichton (1763-1856)

Description: First page of an ‘Extract of a letter from St Petersburg’ on a meteorite and a mammoth’, addressed to William Babington.

Transcript:

“We have lately had two remarkable phenomena in Natural History arrise [sic] in this capital; the one a meteorological stone weighing about 92 pounds weight, the other an entire mammoth of Siberia, the white skin of which is nearly preserved. The first I have seen the second I am tomorrow. The meteorological stone is in every respect like those which Sir Joseph Banks received from Benares. The same kind of black vitrified crust, and externally the same kind of appearance with the fragments of others you have so often seen. In one part however there is a kind of metallic vein runs thro’ this stone. It is exceedingly narrow or thin, & has the appearance of Pyrites. The Minister of the Interior promised me a piece of this stone, & the procés verbal to send to England, but altho’ I have called on him at least 12 times for that purpose, I have not been able to obtain either the one or the other. The stone is deposited in the academy and therefore will now be guarded with due care.-

I cannot as yet give you any satisfactory account of the mammoth. It had been preserved since the day of its death in a bed of ice & snow but during the heat of one of the late summers, either it became exposed or part of the mountain where it had died fell down, & rolled along with it. It’s [sic] grinders I am told are not pointed like those of the American Mammoth, but are like those of the elephant, & shew that it was not carnivorous, but the great singularity is the skin which is covered with hair. It is in fact a thick & long fur some of which I have seen, & this seems to prove that it may have been a natural inhabitant of cold climates. Dr C to Dr Babington. 20th August 1807.”

Crichton, who was elected to the Society on 4 January 1811, was a Scottish physician, appointed physician-in-ordinary to Tsar Alexander, September 1804. The above letter likely references the ‘Adams’ Mammoth and the ‘Timochin’ stone.

Date: 20 August 1807

Format: Letter

Archive reference: LDGSL/1/15

Image reference: 10-10

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Lake Patengan, Java

Title: Tĕlaga-Patengan (‘Lake Patengan’)

Creator: J Tempeltey

Description: Lithograph of Lake Patengan (or Patenggang) on the island of Java, Indonesia. It is also known as Situ Patengan/Patenggang locally.

Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, a German-Dutch botanist, came to Java as a surgeon in the Dutch colonial army whilst fleeing a ten year prison sentence for murdering a rival in a duel. He settled on the island and lived there for most of the rest of his life, making extensive studies of the land and its people.

This image was published in Junghuhn’s Landschaften-Atlas zu Java, which accompanied his four volume Java: deszelfs gedaante, bekleeding en inwendige struktuur (Java: its shape, vegetation cover and inner construction), (Amsterdam: PN Van Kampen, 1850-1854).

Date: [1850-1854]

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 09-19a

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Geological map of Northumberland (Wood, 1831)

 

 

Title: Geological map of Northumberland

Creator: By or after Nicholas Wood (1795-1865)

Description: Geological map of the county of Northumberland, manuscript colouring by or after Nicholas Wood, [1831], on base map ‘A New and Correct Map of the County of Northumberland divided into Wards’, engraved by Jones, Smith & Co, published by Charles Smith, 1825. With key. Scale-1:220,000, 54cm x 47cm. Dissected on cloth.

Note: The colouring is from ‘Wood, Nicholas’, “On the Geology of a part of Northumberland and Cumberland”, ‘Transactions of the Natural History Society of Northumberland, Durham and Newcastle Upon Tyne’, vol 1 (1831), pp302-334′, plate XXVIII. However it is unclear if the map was actually coloured by Wood (and therefore was the artwork for the above) or was copied from Wood’s map by another hand. The map is from the collection of George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855) who was interested in geological mapping.

Date: Colouring [1831], base map, 1825

Format: Watercolour on engraved base

Archive reference: LDGSL/947/6/D/1/2

Image reference: 07-127

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Meteorites (ordinary chondrite)

Title: Meteorites (ordinary chondrite)

Description: This plate includes the ‘Timochin’ stone which was observed to fall during a thunderstorm at 3pm on 25 March 1807 at Timochin, Kaluzhsk Province, Russia.

Source: Karl von Schreibers, ‘Beyträge zur Geschichte und Kenntniss meteorischer Stein- und Metall-Massen, und der Erscheinungen, welche deren Niederfallen zu begleiten pflegen’ (1820). Tab VII.

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 10-09

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

District of the Lakes (Otley, 1837)

Title: ‘District of the Lakes’

Creator: Jonathan Otley (1766-1856)

Description: Manuscript geological colouring on a printed map issued by Jonathan Otley, Keswick, engraved by J & G Menzies, Edinburgh, with key.

Date: First published 1 June 1827, and updated 20 July 1833 and 1837

Format: Watercolour on paper

Archive reference: LDGSL/947/6/D/3/2

Image reference: 07-126

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

South coast of Java, Indonesia

Title: Südküste ostwärts von Rongkop (‘South coast east of Rongkop’)

Creator: Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, Winckelmann & Söhne

Description: Lithograph of the south coast of the island of Java, Indonesia, east of Rongkop. Rongkop is now a district in the regency of Gunung Kidal, which is in turn part of the province of Yogyakarta Special Region.

Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, a German-Dutch botanist, came to Java as a surgeon in the Dutch colonial army whilst fleeing a ten year prison sentence for murdering a rival in a duel. He settled on the island and lived there for most of the rest of his life, making extensive studies of the land and its people.

This image was drawn by Junghuhn and lithographed by Winckelmann & Söhne. It was published in Junghuhn’s Landschaften-Atlas zu Java, which accompanied his four volume Java: deszelfs gedaante, bekleeding en inwendige struktuur (Java: its shape, vegetation cover and inner construction), (Amsterdam: PN Van Kampen, 1850-1854).

Date: [1850-1854]

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 09-18a

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Whale bones from Spitzbergen

Title: Various whales bones from Spitzbergen, Norway

Creator: unknown

Description: Albumen photograph of miscellaneous whale bones, including vertebra, found by James Lamont in Spitzbergen, Norway during an expedition in the summer of 1859. Lamont reported, “On all parts of Spitzbergen and its islands which I have visited, I have found numerous bones of Whales far inland and high above the sea-level…” Spitzbergen, or Spitsbergen was a whaling base until the 18th century.

The photograph, one of two, accompanied Lamont’s paper, “”Notes about Spitzbergen in 1859”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 16 (1860), pp428-438.

Date: [1859]

Format: Photograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/211 vertebra

Image reference: 10-08

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Valley of Gosau, Salzburg Alps

Title: Valley of Gosau, Salzburg Alps

Creator: Charlotte Murchison (1788-1869)

Description: Valley of Gosau, Salzburg Alps.
Published caption states:”View of Gosau-thal. In the foreground are the church and principal village of Gosau-thal. The wooded mountain on the right is the Horn, that on the left is the Ressenberg; the summit of the former being composed of reddish, gritty sandstone, the latter of greenish, micaceous whetstone; and both are based upon blue marls with a profusion of shells, which are best exposed in deep ravines right and left of the spectator. The steep and arid peaks in front consist of Alpine limestone, chiefly considered as the equivalents of the oolitic series, and are called in the neighbourhood the Stein Gebirge, each peak being known by a local name, as the “Donner Kogel,” ” Henner Kogel,” &c.”

Source: From Adam Sedgwick’s and Roderick Impey Murchison’s paper “A Sketch of the Structure of the Eastern Alps; with Sections through the Newer Formations on the Northern Flanks of the Chain, and through the Tertiary Deposits of Styria, &c. &c.”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 2, Volume 3 (1832) pp301-420, plate 40.

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 05-45

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Section of a [gold] mine, north of Orenburg, Russia

Title: Section of a [gold] mine, north of Orenburg, Russia

Creator: Captain Gramavilof after Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann

Description: ‘Section of a [gold] mine north of Orenburg by Captain Gramavilof’, copied from Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann’s collection. The captions are in Russian with some English translations in Greenough’s and William Thomas Horner Fox Strangways’ hand.

William Thomas Horner Fox Strangways, later 4th Earl of Ilchester ( 1795-1865) was an English diplomat, attached to the embassy at St Petersburg between December 1816 to June 1820.

Amongst a series of items on Russian geology which were either drawn or acquired by Strangways when he was attached to the embassy in St Petersburg, and sent to George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855). The labels by Greenough on the reverse indicate that all were copied from the ‘collection of [Benedikt Franz Johann von] Hermann’, another foreign geologist who was based in Russia.

Date: [1809-1820]

Format: Watercolour on paper, mounted on linen

Archive reference: LDGSL/995/6

Image reference: 08-25

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Skull of a whale from Spitzbergen

Title: Skull of a whale from Spitzbergen, Norway

Creator: unknown

Description: Albumen photograph of part of a skull of a whale, found by James Lamont in Spitzbergen, Norway during an expedition in the summer of 1859. Lamont reported, “On all parts of Spitzbergen and its islands which I have visited, I have found numerous bones of Whales far inland and high above the sea-level…some of these were discovered and brought to me by the sailing-master of my yacht, so that I cannot personally vouch for the accuracy of the heights and distances marked on all of them; but one large piece of a jawbone (sent in October 1859) was discovered by myself at 40 feet above the sea. It was part of an entire skeleton, which lay half-buried in moss at about half-a-mile distance from the sea in Walter Thymen’s Straits, North-east Spitzbergen.”

The photograph, one of two, accompanied Lamont’s paper, “”Notes about Spitzbergen in 1859”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 16 (1860), pp428-438.

Spitzbergen, or Spitsbergen was a whaling base until the 18th century.

Date: [1859]

Format: Photograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/211 skull

Image reference: 10-07

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

North coast of Java, Indonesia

Title: Nordküste bei Samarang (‘North coast at Samarang’)

Creator: Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, Winckelmann & Söhne

Description: Lithograph of the north coast of the island of Java, Indonesia. The title refers to what is now the city of Semarang, the fifth largest city in Indonesia. In this image some buildings are visible beyond the hills.

Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, a German-Dutch botanist, came to Java as a surgeon in the Dutch colonial army whilst fleeing a ten year prison sentence for murdering a rival in a duel. He settled on the island and lived there for most of the rest of his life, making extensive studies of the land and its people.

This image was drawn by Junghuhn and lithographed by Winckelmann & Söhne. It was published in Junghuhn’s Landschaften-Atlas zu Java, which accompanied his four volume Java: deszelfs gedaante, bekleeding en inwendige struktuur (Java: its shape, vegetation cover and inner construction), (Amsterdam: PN Van Kampen, 1850-1854).

Date: [1850-1854]

Format: Lithograph

Image reference: 09-17a

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Map showing the distribution of cholera in London

Title: Map showing the distribution of cholera in London and its environs from June 27th-July 21st 1866

Description: Scale approximately 1 mile to 2 inches or 1:31,380. Published with the Report of the Medical Officer of the Privy Council.

Date: 1867

Format: Hand-coloured. Printed on paper, dissected and mounted on linen

Image reference: 07-123

Size of original: 64 cm. x 92 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 x 70 cm

‘The Stranger’

Title: ‘The Stranger’, an erratic boulder

Creator: Tannatt William Edgeworth David (1858-1934)

Description: ‘The Stranger’ an erratic of granite, weighing over 30 tons weathered out of the Permo-Carboniferous boulder beds at Derrinal near Heathcote, Victoria, Australia.

One of a series of seven photographs of Permo-Carboniferous glacial features in Victoria, Australia, which accompanied David’s paper read in May 1896, and published as: David, T W E. “Evidences of Glacial Action in Australia in Permo-Carboniferous Time”, Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 52 (1896), pp289-301. Photographs cited on p295.

Date: [c.1895]

Format: Black and white photograph.

Archive reference: LDGSL/945-1

Image reference: 05-44

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

The Gigantic Greenland Whale

Title: The Gigantic Greenland Whale

Creator: George Johann Scharf (1788-1860)

Description: Print, ‘Gigantic Whale, The Greenland whale (or Baloena Musculus) was found dead on the coast of Belgium, floating at a distance of twelve miles from Ostend, on the 3rd November 1827 and was cast on the sands on the east side of the harbour…The upper jaw was fitted up with 800 fanons or whalebones and from the calculations made by the late Baron Cuvier and the Professors in Paris this enormous animal must have lived from 900-1000 years.’

On the lower left and lower right of the print, is the exterior and interior of what seems to be a specially constructed viewing building to house the skeleton.

The whale was exhibited in London in 1832.

Date: June 1832

Format: Lithograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/649

Image reference: 10-06

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Bridge at Dunkeld

Title: Stone bridge over a river, from an album of sketches by John MacCulloch

Creator: John MacCulloch

Description: Drawing of a stone bridge passing over a river in a wooded area in Dunkeld, near Perth, Scotland. It was produced by John MacCulloch, a geologist who produced one of the first geological maps of Scotland.

Date: [1822-1826]

Format: Drawing

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/8

Image reference: 09-16

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Timber supports for mining

 

 

Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print showing correct methods of installing timber supports for mining. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 4.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.

Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 08-23

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Carte tectonique de l’Eurasie (Argand, 1928)

Title: Carte tectonique de l’Eurasie

Creator: Emile Argand (1879-1940)

Description: A very early tectonic map of Europe and Asia.  This map was originally produced on a scale of 1:8,000,000 for the 13th International Geological Congress held in Brussels in 1922

Date: 1928

Format: Geological map.

Image reference: 07-122

Size of original: 55 cm. x 66 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 x 70 cm

‘Rocks near Sandside’

Title: ‘Rocks near Sandside’

Creator: Peter Mazell after drawing by Charles Cordiner

Description: Print, ‘Rocks near Sandside’. One of a series of six prints given to the Society by George Bellas Greenough, 21 May 1813.

Date: [c.1770s-1780s]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/516

Image reference: 05-43

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

‘Meteorolites’

Title: ‘Meteorolites’

Creator: James Sowerby (1757-1822)

Description: Specimens or fragments of eight ‘meteorolites’ which fell in Great Britain. The caption reads: [Central specimen] ‘No.1 One which was seen to fall from the atmosphere, near the Wold Cottage, Yorkshire, December 13, 1795. Weight 56lbs’
[Left specimen] ‘No.2 Part of one which fell at Possil, Scotland, April 5, 1804.’
[Right specimen] ‘No.3 Part of one which fell at Tipperary, Ireland, August, 1810.’
‘These are the only three that have fallen in Great Britain, similar stones have fallen in thousands in some parts of the world and have not been found under any other circumstances. They are accompanied by loud explosions. For a fuller account see Sowerby’s British Mineralogy Vol 2. They contain an earthy substance, No. 4 Semi-vitreous substance in rectangular fragments. No.5 Earthy laminated globules. No.6 Ductile iron alloyed with nichel. No.7 Iron pyrites, surrounding malleable iron. No.8, [blank]
The originals are in the Museum of James Sowerby, FLS, G S, &c, No.2 Maud Place, Lambeth, by whom the plate is published May 25, 1812.’

Date: 25 May 1812

Format: Hand coloured etching

Archive reference: LDGSL/545

Image reference: 10-05

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Buildings on a rocky outcrop

Title: Buildings on a rocky outcrop, from an album of sketches by John MacCulloch

Creator: John MacCulloch

Description: Sketch of a rocky outcrop with a number of buildings. The sketch was drawn by John MacCulloch, a geologist who produced one of the first geological maps of Scotland.

Date: [1810-1832]

Format: Ink sketch

Archive reference: LDGSL/78/2/8

Image reference: 09-15

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Timber supports for mining

 

 

Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print showing correct methods of installing timber supports for mining. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 5.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.

Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 08-22

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Geological map of England and Wales, Sheet 101 NE Cockermouth (1890)

Title: Geological map of England and Wales, Old Series, Sheet 101 NE Cockermouth

Creator:  The Geological Survey

Description: Sheet 101 NE from the 1″ Old Series of geological maps for England and Wales.

Date: 1890

Format: Lithograph and water-colour on paper.  Dissected and mounted on linen.

Image reference: 07-121

Size of original: 62 cm. x 45 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm

‘Human fossil’

Title: ‘Human fossil’ or ‘ante-diluvian child’

Creator: Unknown

Description: Drawing of the ‘Human Fossil’, from Belgium, which was exhibited in Leicester Square, London, in June 1840 at a cost of £1 per person entry. The accompanying handbill claimed that this was the fossil of an ‘ante-diluvian child’, that is a fossil of a child who lived before Noah’s Flood.

In the first half of the 19th century, scientific studies for some were still heavily influenced by religious beliefs, indeed many of the Geological Society’s early members were Anglican clerics. Geologists, such as the Reverend William Buckland (1784-1856), theorised that the large number of diluvial deposits found throughout northern Europe and around the Alps, were evidence of some kind of ‘mega-tsunami’, and suggested that this was the biblical deluge. In the 1840s, however, the Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz demonstrated that these signs could be attributed to the actions of glaciers during the Earth’s Ice Age.

This particular example is likely to be a ‘concretion’ that is a mineral mass which forms between layers of sedimentary rock.

Date: 1841

Format: Conté drawing and chalk

Archive reference: LDGSL/547

Image reference: 10-04

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘The Bullers of Buchan’

Title: ‘The Bullers of Buchan’

Creator: Peter Mazell after drawing by Charles Cordiner

Description: Print, ‘The Bullers of Buchan’, a collapsed sea cave near Peterhead, Scotland.

Date: [c.1770s-1780s]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/516

Image reference: 05-42

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

On Mount Rigi, Switzerland

Title: View on Rigi

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of a view from Mount Rigi, showing other mountains framed by pine forest. Mount Rigi is situated between Lake Lucerne and Lake Zug, Switzerland, and is the site of the first mountain rack railway in Europe, opened in 1871 and still operational.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/51

Image reference: 09-14

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Timber supports for mining

 

 
Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print showing correct methods of installing timber supports for mining. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 4.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.

Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Image reference: 08-21

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Carte géologique de la France 1:80,000. Feuille 126 Besançon (1892)

Title: Carte géologique de la France 1:80,000. Feuille 126 Besançon

Creator: Service de la Carte détaillée de la France

Description: One of the original 1:80,000 sheets from the first detailed geological survey of France

Publisher: Service de la Carte détaillée de la France

Date: 1892

Format: Geological map

Image reference: 07-120

Size of original: 92 cm. x 63 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 x 70 cm

 

Lake Geneva, Switzerland/France

Title: On lake Geneva

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of a boat sailing on Lake Geneva. The lake is partly in Switzerland and partly in France, and is the largest lake in both of those countries.

Date: [1896]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/46

Image reference: 09-13

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

‘Bird catching at Orkney’

Title: ‘Bird catching at Orkney’

Creator: Unknown

Description: Print, ‘Bird catching at Orkney’. One of a series of six 18th century prints given to the Society by George Bellas Greenough, 21 May 1813.

Date: [18th century]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/516

Image reference: 05-41

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Map of the Province of Orenburg

Title: Map of the Province of Orenburg

Creator: William Thomas Horner Fox Strangways, later 4th Earl of Ilchester ( 1795-1865)

Description: Engraved, topographical base map entitled ‘Province of Orenburg’, [Russia], with multiple pencil annotations in an unknown Russian hand, some of which have been overwritten in ink by William Thomas Horner Fox Strangways, which was copied from [Benedikt Franz Johann von] ‘Hermann’s collection’, [1816-1820].

Strangways was an English diplomat, attached to the embassy at St Petersburg between December 1816 to June 1820.

Amongst a series of items on Russian geology which were either drawn or acquired by Strangways when he was attached to the embassy in St Petersburg, and sent to George Bellas Greenough (1778-1855). The labels by Greenough on the reverse indicate that all were copied from the ‘collection of [Benedikt Franz Johann von] Hermann’, another foreign geologist who was based in Russia.

Date: [1816-1820]

Format: Engraved base on paper with pencil annotations

Archive reference: LDGSL/995-4

Image reference: 08-20

Recommended print size: Up to 100 x 70cm

A Map of the Principal Features of the Geology of Yorkshire (Phillips, 1853)

Title: A map of the principal features of the geology of Yorkshire

Creator: John Phillips

Description: Geological map of the English county of Yorkshire, today divided into North, South and West Yorkshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.

Publisher: John Phillips

Date: 1853

Format: Geological map

Image reference: 07-11

Size of original: 82 cm. x 65 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 x 90 cm

Advertisement for a ‘Human Fossil’

Title: Advert for the exhibition of a ‘Human Fossil’

Creator: Unknown

Description: Handbill advertising an exhibition of a ‘Human Fossil’, purportedly found at Diehgen, near Brussels in Belgium. A drawing of this ‘fossil’ can be found here: www.flickr.com/photos/geologicalsocietylibrary/1362170589….

Date: 1840

Format: Printed handbill

Archive reference: LDGSL/547

Image reference: 10-03

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Lake Lucerne, Switzerland

Title: Vierwaldstättersee, Schweiz

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of part of Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, and surrounding mountains. The lake is an extremely irregular shape, with a number of different arms and bends.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/42

Image reference: 09-12

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Entrance to the Grotto of Antiparos

Title: Entrance to the Grotto of Antiparos

Creator: James Mason after drawing by Richard Dalton

Description: Print showing the entrance to the famous grotto on the Greek Island of Antiparos.

Date: [c.1751]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/523

Image reference: 05-40

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Iron smelting works, Siberia

Title: ‘Profilriss der Zwey Eisenhohoefen zu Kyschtminsk Dem Herrn Nikita Nikitilsch Demidov gehorig’

Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print of a cross section of an iron smelting works in Siberia. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 5.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.

Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/411 plate 5

Image reference: 08-19

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

The ‘Hope Pearl’

Title: The ‘Hope Pearl’

Creator: Unknown

Description: Print entitled ‘The Pearl, weighing 1800 grains’. Now known as the ‘Hope Pearl’, it is one of the largest saltwater pearls in existence and named after Henry Philip Hope who acquired it for his collection.

The caption states that it was given to the Society by Viscount Cole, however this is incorrect. Instead it was presented by William Cole, Esq, of Barnyards Inn on 5 June 1818.

Date: [c.1818]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/546

Image reference: 10-02

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Carte des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique-Nord [Map of North America] (Maclure, c. 1809)

Title: Carte des Etats-Unis de l’Amerique-Nord [Map of North America]

Creator: William Maclure

Description: At an approximate scale of 1:7,000,000

Map was published in: Maclure, W, “Observations on the Geology of the United States, explanatory of a Geological Map”, ‘Transactions of the American Philosophical Society’, vol VI, pp411-427.

William Maclure (1763-1840), was born in Ayr, Scotland.  He became a partner in an American mercantile house and travelled to France and Virginia until 1803 when he returned to Britain.   In 1807 he commenced the Herculean task of geologically mapping the United States.  His first attempt was published in 1809, and a revised version published in 1817.

The map delineates the geology based on Wernerian principles of rock classification.

Date: [c.1809]

Format: Handcoloured. Printed on paper. Dissected and mounted on linen

Image reference: 07-119

Size of original: 60 cm. x 45 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm.

Woman making pottery, Brittany

Title: Old woman making pottery of neolithic type. St Jean la Poterie

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of a woman making a pot in the commune of Saint-Jean-la-Poterie, Brittany.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/31

Image reference: 09-11

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Marble Grotto in the Island of Antiparos

Title: Marble Grotto in the Island of Antiparos

Creator: Thomas Salmon

Description: Print showing the famous cave on the Greek Island of Antiparos.

Date: [c.1736]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/523

Image reference: 05-39

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Smelting works, Siberia

Title: ‘Sibirischer Kohofen mit Clindergeblaese’

Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print of a smelting works in Siberia. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 8.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.
Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/411 pl 8

Image reference: 08-18

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Meteorite that fell in County Limerick

Title: Meteorite that fell in County Limerick

Creator: Etheldred Benett (1775-1845)

Description: Watercolour of a meteorite that fell in County Limerick in September 1813.

Benett’s caption reads: “Sketch of a Meteoric Stone which fell on the estate of the late Reverend Mr Blakeney near Patricks Well in the County of Limerick in September 1813, and which was presented to the University of Oxford by the Reverend John Griffiths of Bishopstrow, Wiltshire in May 1825 – weight 19 pounds. The streaked and dotted part is the fracture.”

Date: [1825]

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/544/3

Image reference: 10-01

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

Cathedral cloisters, Le Puy

Title: Le Puy Cathedral, Cloisters

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of the cloisters of Le Puy cathedral, in Le Puy-en-Velay, France. The cathedral is a place of pilgrimage in its own right – Charlemagne made two pilgrimages to the site – as well as being part of the pilgrimage route to the Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela. The cloisters in this image date from the 12th century.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/18

Image reference: 09-10

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Plan of the Pyschminskischen Steel Factory

Title: ‘Plan der Pyschminskischen Stahlfabrik’

Creator: Benedikt Franz Johann von Hermann (1755-1815)

Description: Print showing a plan of the Pyschminskischen Steel Factory, Siberia. From Hermann, B F J von. ‘Mineralogische Reisen in Sibirien. Vom Jahr 1783 bis 1796’, (1797-1801), plate 9.

Hermann was an Austrian geologist, mineralogist and mining engineer, who travelled to St Petersburg in 1781 and entered the service of Catherine the Great, inspecting mines and iron & smelting works in the Urals and Siberia. He produced a number of publications, some printed by his own publishing company, on mining practices and metallurgy.

Date: [c.1800]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/411 pl 9

Image reference: 08-17

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Subterranean galleries in the Island of Milo

Title: Subterranean galleries in the Island of Milo

Creator: Unknown

Description: Print, ‘Perspective view of the cave, serving as a porch to the subterranean galleries in the Island of Milo’, Greece. One of three prints on this subject which were given to the Society by George Bellas Greenough.

Date: [c.1730-1780]

Format: Engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/523

Image reference: 05-38

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Section showing the general characters of the gold-bearing rocks with their superficial detritus…’

Title: Geological section ‘showing the general characters of the gold-bearing rocks with their superficial detritus…’

Creator: Evan Hopkins jnr

Description: Geological section ‘showing the general characters of the gold-bearing rocks with their superficial detritus and the precious metal in situ near the surface and more or less covered with sand and gravel in the hollows.’

From communication published in abstract form as: Hopkins, E. “On the Geological Formation and the Gold-Bearing Rocks of the Colony of Victoria”, ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’, vol 10 (1854), pp324-325. Communication and section were published in its entirety in: Hopkins, E. ‘On the Geology of the Gold-bearing Rocks of the World, and the Gold-fields of Victoria’, Melbourne, 1853.

Date: 1853

Format: Watercolour

Archive reference: LDGSL/171

Image reference: 08-16

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Geological Map of the United States and the British Provinces of North America (Marcou, 1853)

Title: Geological map of the United States and the British Provinces of North America

Creator: Jules Marcou (1824-1898)

Description: A geological map of the USA and Canada by Jules Marcou

Publisher: Gould and Lincoln

Date: 1853

Format: Geological map

Image reference: 07-118

Size of original: 84 cm. x 62 cm.

Recommended print size: up to 100 x 70 cm

Glacial valley, France

Title: La Tuliere and Sanadoire…

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of a glacial trough (U-shaped valley), France.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/7

Image reference: 09-09

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Geological views and sections of Essex/Hertfordshire and between London and Cambridge (Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological view and section in Essex and Hertforshire/Geological view and section of the country between London and Cambridge

Creator: William Smith

Description: Two of William Smith’s cross-sections published on the same sheet.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological cross-section.  Lithograph and water-colour on paper.

Image reference: 07-116

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm.

Views of the French coast

Title: Two views of the French coast

Creator: Unknown

Description: Print of two views of the French coast between Grisnez and Audreselles and between La Creche and Moulin Hubert, showing Portland beds. The print was probably intended to illustrate the William Henry Fitton’s paper, “Observations on some of the Strata between the Chalk and the Oxford Oolite, in the South-east of England”, ‘Transactions of the Geological Society of London’, Series 2, Vol 4 (1836), pp103-388, but was never published.

Date: [1836]

Format: Engraving with aquatint

Archive reference: LDGSL/518

Image reference: 05-37

Recommended print size: Up to 16 x 12 inches (40 x 30cm)

‘Gold mines, County of Wicklow’

Title: ‘Gold mines, County Wicklow’

Creator: John Bluck after Thomas Sautelle Roberts

Description: Print, ‘Gold mines, County of Wicklow’.

Caption: “In the Fore-ground are several Figures employed in working or building; in the Middle ground they are seen digging and barrowing the Earth, which contains the particles of Gold : on the first discovery of these Mines, pieces of pure Gold were found valued at eighty pounds and upwards, one of which may be seen at the Levarian Museum. The Scene closes with Croughan and the adjoining Hills”.

Date: Published in London, 19 May 1804

Format: Coloured aquatint

Archive reference: LDGSL/410

Image reference: 08-15

Recommended print size: Up to 70 x 50cm

Geological view and sections of Norfolk and Suffolk (Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological view and section of Norfolk/Geological view and section through Suffolk to Ely

Creator: William Smith

Description: Two of William Smith’s cross-sections published together on the same sheet.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Geological cross-section. Lithograph and water-colour on paper.

Image reference: 07-115

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm

Geological Sections in Illustration of the Map of the Mining District of Cornwall (Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological sections in illustration of the map of the mining district of Cornwall by R. Thomas.

Creator: William Smith

Description: A set of cross-sections drawn by William Smith for use in conjunction with the map of Cornwall by R. Thomas.

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Cross-sections.  Lithograph and water-colour on paper

Image reference: 07-114

Recommended print size: up to 70 cm x 50 cm

Le Puy, France

Title: Le Puy from Expailly

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of the city of Le Puy-en-Velay, southeast France. The image clearly shows the St Michel d’Aiguilhe chapel, on the left peak, the iron Notre-Dame de France statue in the centre, and the cathedral to the right of this central peak, the Rocher Corneille. This statue is 16m high, and is made from 213 Russian cannons seized during the Seige of Sevastopol.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/5

Image reference: 09-08

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Peculiar appearance of a rock surface

Title: ‘Peculiar appearance of the rock surface…’

Creator: Matthew Moggridge

Description: Photograph of the ‘Peculiar appearance of the rock surface (nearly at right angles with the bedding) in a quarry of the Carboniferous Sandstone near Swansea’. Moggridge, an antiquary and geologist, is the figure who appears in the photograph.

Date: 1861

Format: Black and white photograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/551

Image reference: 05-36

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Plan of Stora Grufna coppermine, Sweden

Title: Plan of Stora Grufna coppemine, Sweden

Creator: Samuel Gustaf Hermelin (1744-1820)

Description: Print of a plan of Stora Grufna coppermine, Sweden, engraved by C Akrel.

Date: [after 1794]

Format: Coloured engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/412

Image reference: 08-14

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Section of the Strata through Hampshire and Wiltshire to Bath (Smith, 1819)

Title: Section of the strata through Hampshire and Wiltshire to Bath

Creator: William Smith

Description: One of Smith’s sections through England and Wales, published by John Cary in 1819

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Watercolours and lithographed ink on paper

Image reference: 07-113

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm.

Geological View of the Mining District of Cornwall (Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological view of the mining district of Cornwall corresponding with the map from Chasewater to Cambourne shewing the elevations of the hills and the depths to which the mines are extended by R. Thomas

Creator: William Smith

Description: One of Smith’s geological views and cross-sections through England and Wales published by John Cary in 1819.  This section was done with reference to R. Thomas’s map of Cornwall

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Watercolours and lithographed ink on paper

Image reference: 07-112

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm.

 

 

Fungus Rock, Gozo

Title: The General or Fungus Rock Gozo, showing the Faura gorge and downthrow. Extensive Pleistocene Beds in the neighbourhood

Creator: John Henry Cooke

Description: Photo of Fungus Rock, a limestone islet on the west coast of the island of Gozo, part of Malta. It stands at the entrance to an almost circular lagoon. Its name originates from the discovery by the Knights of Malta, who lived on the islands from the 16th to the 18th centuries, of what they called the Malta Fungus. This plant (not actually a fungus) was considered to be very valuable, with medicinal properties, and was consequently heavily guarded. The islet’s Maltese name is Il-Gebla tal-General.

This image accompanied a paper by Cooke read at the Geological Society on 21st November 1894. It was published without the photos as, ‘The Pleistocene Beds of the Maltese Islands’, Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, vol.51 (1895), pp49-50.

Date: [1893-1894]

Format: Black and white albumen photograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/936/15

Image reference: 05-35

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Visitors to Brehec, Brittany

Title: Brehec Bay

Creator: [Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy?]

Description: Photo of a group of visitors to Brehec beach, Brittany, clambering across a rocky part of the coastline.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/EUR/4

Image reference: 09-07

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Section of Stora Grufna coppermine, Sweden

Title: Section of Stora Grufna coppemine, Sweden

Creator: Samuel Gustaf Hermelin (1744-1820)

Description: Print of a section of Stora Grufna coppermine, Sweden, engraved by C Akrel.

Date: [after 1794]

Format: Coloured engraving

Archive reference: LDGSL/412

Image reference: 08-13

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Geological view and section through Dorsetshire and Somersetshire to Taunton (Smith, 1819)

Title: Geological view and section through Dorsetshire and Somersetshire to Taunton

Creator: William Smith

Description: One of Smith’s cross-sections through England and Wales published by John Cary in 1819

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Watercolours and lithographed ink on paper

Image reference: 07-111

Recommended print size: up to 70 x 50 cm.

Section of a well sunk at Hampstead Road Reservoir

Title: Section of a well sunk at Hampstead Road Reservoir

Creator: Robert William Mylne (1817-1890)

Description: Print of a ‘Section of a well sunk at Hampstead Road Reservoir, London 1838’. Probably related to: Mylne, R W. “On the supply of water from artesian wells in the London Basin…”, ‘Transactions of the Institution of Civil Engineers’, vol 3 (1842), pp229-244.

Date: [c.1840]

Format: Lithograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/445

Image reference: 08-12

Recommended print size: Up to 20 x 16 inches (50 x 40cm)

Vertical Section of Strata in Surry (Smith, 1819)

Title: Vertical Section of Strata in Surry dipping Northward, Section of Strata in Sussex dipping Southward

Creator: William Smith

Publisher: John Cary

Date: 1819

Format: Handcoloured. Printed on paper.

Image reference: 07-110

Recommended print size:up to 70 x 50 cm.

View from a Kurunegala rock, Sri Lanka

Title: View from Kurunegala rock, Ceylon

Creator: Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy

Description: Photo of the landscape, including the ancient man-made lake, seen from one of the rocks at Kurunegala, Sri Lanka. Today Kurunegala is a major city, being the capital of the North Western Province and at the junction of a number of main roads, while in the 13th and 14th centuries it was briefly a royal capital. The city is surrounded by eight large rocky outcrops, six of which are named after the animals they are said to resemble (elephant, tortoise, eel, goat, beetle, monkey). It is likely that this image was taken from the summit of one of these rocks, probably the largest – ethagala (elephant) rock.

Date: [1890s-1900s]

Format: Black and white photographic lantern slide

Archive reference: LDGSL/1088/AC/CEY/1/4

Image reference: 09-06

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Malta Beds from Gebel Ciantar

Title: From Gebel Ciantar. Shewing the whole series of the Malta Beds

Creator: John Henry Cooke

Description: Photo in which the layers of sedimentary rock (beds) on Malta can be seen in the cliffs. You can also see the traditional terraced fields on the clifftops. Gebel Ciantar is an area near Dingli Cliffs, in the southwest of the island, formerly the site of a Bronze Age village.

This image accompanied a paper by Cooke read at the Geological Society on 21st November 1894. It was published without the photos as, ‘The Pleistocene Beds of the Maltese Islands’, Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, vol.51 (1895), pp49-50.

Date: [1893-1894]

Format: Black and white albumen photograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/936/13

Image reference: 05-34

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)

Pleistocene geological feature, Malta

Title: Unidentified Pleistocene geological feature in Malta

Creator: John Henry Cooke

Description: Photo of an unidentified Pleistocene geological feature, Malta.

This image accompanied a paper by Cooke read at the Geological Society on 21st November 1894. It was published without the photos as, ‘The Pleistocene Beds of the Maltese Islands’, Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, vol.51 (1895), pp49-50.

Date: [1893-1894]

Format: Black and white albumen photograph

Archive reference: LDGSL/936/12

Image reference: 05-33

Recommended print size: Up to 10 x 8 inches (25 x 14cm)